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CasperParks
07-26-2013, 09:29 PM
From Huffington Post: Geoff Marcy, NASA Planet Hunter, On The Lookout For Alien Ships In Deep Space (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/25/nasa-planet-hunter-geoff-marcy_n_3647978.html):

Geoff Marcy isn't content to just look for more inhabitable planets with the Kepler space telescope. He wants to find ET spaceships hidden in deep space.

The University of California at Berkeley astronomer is an official NASA investigator assigned to the Kepler mission and credited with confirming almost three-quarters of the first 100 exoplanets -- planets outside our solar system -- found by Kepler, as reported in Open Minds.TV.

Nearly 900 of these "new" planets have been detected since the 1990s, with information on more than 3,000 planet candidates being examined by scientists like Marcy.

Marcy is absolutely convinced Earth is part of a galactic neighborhood teeming with intelligent life. "The universe is simply too large for there not to be another intelligent civilization out there," he told The Sydney Morning Herald.

"Really, the proper question is: 'How far away is our nearest intelligent neighbor?' They could be 10 light-years, 100 light-years, a million light-years or more. We have no idea."

Click here to read full article at Huffington Post. (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/25/nasa-planet-hunter-geoff-marcy_n_3647978.html)

norenrad
07-26-2013, 10:51 PM
It's getting closer, we'll hear the declaration of intelligent life soon.

majicbar
07-27-2013, 12:33 AM
But now Keppler if functionally dead. Without the ability to point accurately it cannot any longer hunt for planets. Another observatory will have to be put up in it's place. Hopefully we will find some way to allow the pointing gyroscopes to have a much longer lifetime, it is sad to see that this vital element of such observatories has not been improved. Hubble has only a matter of time before it too again has this issue come up, and it's great contributions also end.

majicbar
07-27-2013, 06:55 AM
But now Keppler if functionally dead. Without the ability to point accurately it cannot any longer hunt for planets. Another observatory will have to be put up in it's place. Hopefully we will find some way to allow the pointing gyroscopes to have a much longer lifetime, it is sad to see that this vital element of such observatories has not been improved. Hubble has only a matter of time before it too again has this issue come up, and it's great contributions also end. re:Source http://www.space.com/22104-nasa-kepler-exoplanet-spacecraft-recovery.html

CasperParks
07-27-2013, 07:33 AM
But now Keppler if functionally dead. Without the ability to point accurately it cannot any longer hunt for planets. Another observatory will have to be put up in it's place. Hopefully we will find some way to allow the pointing gyroscopes to have a much longer lifetime, it is sad to see that this vital element of such observatories has not been improved. Hubble has only a matter of time before it too again has this issue come up, and it's great contributions also end.

Hubble was worked on a number of times via spacewalks.

majicbar
07-27-2013, 10:11 AM
Hubble was worked on a number of times via spacewalks. And without the Space Shuttle to capture and repair the Hubble Space Telescope repair is no longer possible. They now only indicate they may develop a space bus to capture the Hubble and deorbit it, but wouldn't you think they could develop a space bus that could be the pointing mechanism once the reaction wheels fail?

Longeyes
07-28-2013, 05:06 PM
He's in for a little wait
The ESA COROT has also bitten the dust with a computer card failure.
From New Scientist:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23772-european-planet-hunter-pronounced-dead-in-space.html#.UfUyLOe9Kc0
Both ESA and NASA are planning to launch their next-generation exoplanet missions in 2017. ESA's Characterising Exoplanets Satellite, or Cheops, will scan known worlds for signs of habitability. Meanwhile, NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will hunt for more star-crossing worlds, with a particular focus on small, rocky planets around nearby stars

bruce fiction
09-12-2013, 11:18 PM
I believe there is life in deep space space is just to big for it not to be