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calikid
03-28-2018, 04:32 PM
This thread will deal with Corporations trampling the public's privacy rights.
Either through outright greed (selling our data), or incompetence (data breeches).

Used as a sister thread to our "Emerging Surveillance State" (Government violations) thread.

calikid
03-28-2018, 04:39 PM
CROSS POST FROM SISTER THREAD.

Bad enough we have to fight to keep the government out of our private data. Now we find Facebook has partners that don't mind violating policy (sharing data without permission) to gain a political edge.

Facebook, Cambridge Analytica and data mining: What you need to know
The world's largest social network is at the center of an international scandal involving voter data, the 2016 US presidential election and Brexit.
by Ian Sherr

Consultants working for Donald Trump's presidential campaign exploited the personal Facebook data of millions.

That's the key message in March 17 stories by The New York Times and the UK's Guardian and Observer newspapers, as well as in statements from Facebook. The stories and statements indicate the social networking giant was duped by researchers, who reportedly gained access to the data of more than 50 million Facebook users, which was then misused for political ads during the 2016 US presidential election.

Until now, most of what you've heard about Facebook and the 2016 election has been focused on meddling by Russian operatives. Those efforts are being investigated by the FBI and the US Senate.

Data consultancy Cambridge Analytica represents a different problem. The UK-based company reportedly acquired data about millions of Facebook users in a way that violated the social network's policies. It then tapped that information to build psychographic profiles of users and their friends, which were utilized for targeted political ads in the UK's Brexit referendum campaign, as well as by Trump's team during the 2016 US election.

Facebook says it told Cambridge Analytica to delete the data, but also that reports suggest the info wasn't destroyed. Cambridge Analytica says it complies with the social network's rules, only receives data "obtained legally and fairly," and did wipe out the data Facebook is worried about.

Here's what you need to know.

What is Cambridge Analytica?

Cambridge Analytica is a UK-based data analytics firm, whose parent company is Strategic Communication Laboratories. Cambridge Analytica helps political campaigns reach potential voters online. The firm combines data from multiple sources, including online information and polling, to build "profiles" of voters. The company then uses computer programs to predict voter behavior, which then could be influenced through specialized advertisements aimed at the voters.

Cambridge Analytica isn't working with a small amount of user data either. The company says it has "5,000 data points on over 230 million American voters" -- or pretty much all of us, considering there are an estimated 250 million people of voting age in the US.

The company has since faced criticism for what executives, including what CEO Alexander Nix, said in a series of undercover videos shot by the UK's Channel 4. In the videos, he discussed lies and seeming blackmail he'd perform as part of his efforts to sway elections.

"We have lots of history of things," Nix said in the videos, "I'm just giving you examples of what can be done and what, what has been done."

Nix has since been suspended from his job as CEO. His comments "do not represent the values or operations of the firm and his suspension reflects the seriousness with which we view this violation," the company said in a statement.
What did Cambridge Analytica do?

Facebook said in a statement late on Friday, March 16, that Cambridge Analytica received user data from Aleksandr Kogan, a lecturer at the University of Cambridge. Kogan reportedly created an app called "thisisyourdigitallife" that ostensibly offered personality predictions to users while calling itself a research tool for psychologists.

The app asked users to log in using their Facebook account. As part of the login process, it asked for access to users' Facebook profiles, locations, what they liked on the service, and importantly, their friends' data as well.

The problem, Facebook says, is that Kogan then sent this user data to Cambridge Analytica without user permission, something that's against the social network's rules.

"Although Kogan gained access to this information in a legitimate way and through the proper channels that governed all developers on Facebook at that time, he did not subsequently abide by our rules," Paul Grewal, a vice president and general counsel at Facebook, said in a statement.

Kogan didn't respond to requests for comment. The New York Times said he cited nondisclosure agreements and declined to provide details about what happened, saying his personality prediction program was "a very standard vanilla Facebook app."

What does this have to do with Trump?

The Trump campaign hired Cambridge Analytica to run data operations during the 2016 election. Steve Bannon, who eventually became Trump's chief strategist, was also reportedly vice president of Cambridge Analytica's board. The company helped the campaign identify voters to target with ads, and gave advice on how best to focus its approach, such as where to make campaign stops. It also helped with strategic communication, like what to say in speeches.
Story Continues (https://www.cnet.com/news/facebook-cambridge-analytica-data-mining-and-trump-what-you-need-to-know/)

calikid
03-28-2018, 04:44 PM
Looks like Zuckerberg and Friends are in for hard times.
Members are fleeing, and now the threat of class action should have a negative impact on their stock price.

Facebook users sue over collection of call, text history
A lawsuit seeking class-action status says a feature that logs calls and texts violated users' privacy.
by Steven Musil

Three users of Facebook's Messenger app filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the social-networking giant, alleging the company violated their privacy by logging the histories of their phone calls and text messages.

The lawsuit was filed after Facebook acknowledged it had been logging some Android users' call and text history, but noting it was with their permission. The feature, which allows Facebook to see when a call or text was sent or received, "has always been opt-in only," Facebook said Sunday.

The lawsuit, filed by three Facebook users in a Northern California federal court, accuses Facebook of violating several state laws and acts, including the California Constitutional Right to Privacy, the Computer Data Access and Fraud Act and the California Consumers Legal Remedies Act.

The lawsuit (see below) seeks class action status.

Facebook has said ....
Story Continues (https://www.cnet.com/news/facebook-users-sue-over-collection-of-call-text-history/)

CasperParks
03-29-2018, 01:33 AM
calikid, great idea for a thread!

Many corporations have arbitration clauses.

Recent legislation was passed that allows corporations to keep legal suits by consumers out of the courts by using arbitration clauses. Also, the legislation protects corporations from class actions lawsuits.

But if they want to sue an individual, no arbitration is needed... Not it would help...

Arbitrators are hired and paid by corporations... Major arbitration rulings against a corporation is akin to biting the hand that feeds you...

Arbitration rulings against a corporation, one has to question the amount of financial loss as compared a court ruling.

I wonder if Facebook has an arbitration clause?

When I have more time, will research for links to legislation...

Also, need to research if the government pays corporations for data storage.

calikid
06-22-2018, 06:54 PM
When I buy$ a game, I'd like to think it comes without marketing/spyware.

Red Shell 'Spyware' Tracks You From Your Games
by Anthony Caruana

A bunch of PC games have been caught with a piece of software that tracks your activity even when you're not playing the game. Red Shell, named after a Mario Kart item, is software that's designed for online marketers to track the effectiveness of various online campaigns. But a massive list of games have been found to contain this tool and it can track your activity even when the game is not being played.

Red Shell matches online activity against marketing campaigns that have been launched by third parties. the problem is, the tracking happens after you've left the game.

The discovery of Red Shell's presence was revealed in a Subreddit early last week. Then, a couple of days ago, a long list of affected games was released. Already, a number of the game developers say they have either removed or are about to remove the software in response to the revelations.

The Reddit post also discusses how to check if a game you're playing. You can look for either "Redshell.dll" or "RedshellSDK.dll" in the Steam install folders although it's possible for developers to integrate that code into their own code so you won't see them.
Story Continues (https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2018/06/red-shell-spyware-tracks-you-from-your-games/)

calikid
06-29-2018, 01:31 PM
I'd like to think California is taking a step in the right direction.


New California Privacy Bill Gives Consumer Sweeping Control Over Their Personal Data

Google and other big tech companies opposed the measure, saying it was too burdensome.
By Paresh Dave

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - California Governor Jerry Brown on Thursday signed data privacy legislation aimed at giving consumers more control over how companies collect and manage their personal information, a proposal that Google and other big companies had opposed as too burdensome.

Under the proposal, large companies, such as those with data on more than 50,000 people, would be required starting in 2020 to let consumers view the data they have collected on them, request deletion of data, and opt out of having the data sold to third parties. Companies must provide equal service to consumers who exercise such rights under the law.

Each violation would carry a $7,500 fine. The law applies to users in California.

“This is a huge step forward for California,” State Senator Bob Hertzberg, a Democrat, said during a livestreamed press conference Thursday. “This is a huge step forward for people ..."

Story continues (https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/california-privacy-bill_us_5b35c730e4b007aa2f7eb34e)

CasperParks
09-24-2018, 11:56 PM
Noisey Reports - Spotify Is Using DNA Tests to Curate Playlists, Which Is Pretty Creepy: click here to read article (https://noisey.vice.com/en_us/article/8x7xd5/spotify-playlists-dna-curation-ancestry).

CasperParks
10-25-2018, 07:58 PM
Credit must be given to Apple CEO Tim Cook for coining a new term "Data Industrial Complex". If he isn't the first to use it, he has brought the terminology to light.

The term can be added to a long list of "Industrial Complexes": Prison Industrial Complex, Military Industrial Complex, Fossil Fuel Industrial Complex and so-on...

Article at USA Today: Apple CEO Tim Cook supports stricter data privacy laws, warns of "Data Industrial Complex" click here to read article. (https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/nation-now/2018/10/24/apple-ceo-tim-cook-calls-stricter-data-privacy-protections/1750919002/)

CasperParks
11-20-2018, 04:23 AM
Engadge article: More companies are chipping their workers like pets, click here to read (https://www.engadget.com/2018/11/16/employee-microchip-security-orwell/). Dated 11/16/18.

Article make reference that one company preparing to chip workers has "hundreds of thousands of employees". They mention a "opt-in", however direct deposit of paychecks started as an "opt-in". I can see the "opt-in" turn into a boycott of potential employees who don't want to be chipped, and or in the near future make chipping a condition of employment.

CasperParks
11-20-2018, 04:30 AM
The Intercept reports: Google’s “Smart City of Surveillance” Faces New Resistance in Toronto, click here to read. (https://theintercept.com/2018/11/13/google-quayside-toronto-smart-city/) Article date 11/13/18

Longeyes
11-21-2018, 08:50 AM
This is a very dangerous precedent. Just laziness on behalf of employers but the consequences could be disastrous.
There need to be new laws to protect citizen rights world-wide to stop this. It is an infringement of personal space and liberty. It’s bad enough that we carry around smart phones, which can be tracked and hacked into even when they are off.
Normalisation will lead to ID chips etc, if things start to go wrong in your country, and democracy gets weakened, and you end in a totalitarian state - control becomes too easy. You already have access to everything you can possibly need with your mind.

CasperParks
11-21-2018, 06:15 PM
This is a very dangerous precedent. Just laziness on behalf of employers but the consequences could be disastrous.

There need to be new laws to protect citizen rights world-wide to stop this. It is an infringement of personal space and liberty.

It’s bad enough that we carry around smart phones, which can be tracked and hacked into even when they are off.

Normalization will lead to ID chips etc, if things start to go wrong in your country, and democracy gets weakened, and you end in a totalitarian state - control becomes too easy. You already have access to everything you can possibly need with your mind.

You're correct with "normalization"... It's baby-steps toward full-blown electronic tattoos or RFID implants in the hand.

calikid
12-04-2018, 04:37 PM
Engadge article: More companies are chipping their workers like pets, click here to read (https://www.engadget.com/2018/11/16/employee-microchip-security-orwell/). Dated 11/16/18.

Article make reference that one company preparing to chip workers has "hundreds of thousands of employees". They mention a "opt-in", however direct deposit of paychecks started as an "opt-in". I can see the "opt-in" turn into a boycott of potential employees who don't want to be chipped, and or in the near future make chipping a condition of employment.

Well, at least here in the west our politicians showed a bit of restraint.... for now.


California in 2007 swiftly moved to block companies from being able to make RFID implants mandatory, as well as blocking the chipping of students in the state.

Seems like voluntary is only a step away from mandatory.
Implants are a wonderful idea for a police state, not so great for the average Joe trying to conduct business without worries some hacker walking past is going send out a pulse to trigger the RFID, and capture whatever data is available.

calikid
02-18-2019, 05:26 PM
Wow! Talk about the shoe being on the other foot. Aiding the enemy?

Google Earth accidentally reveals secret military sites.
By Charlie Osborne.

An update to the Google Earth online platform has accidentally led to the exposure of secretive Taiwanese military locations.

As reported by the South China Morning Post, some of Taiwan's most sensitive military sites have been revealed publicly through the update, which included new three-dimensional renditions of Taipei, New Taipei, Taoyuan, and Taichung.

At the time of writing, a military base which is reportedly a facility for Patriot missiles is crystal clear and no blurring has been implemented to prevent the public from viewing the site at leisure.

It is possible to see the exact location, military base layout, building structures, and the locations of missile launchers.

The Post reports that Taiwan's National Security Bureau and the Military Intelligence Bureau have also become visible on the new maps.
Story Continues (https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/google-earth-accidentally-reveals-secret-military-sites/ar-BBTKzOF?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout)
.
1661

calikid
02-18-2019, 05:37 PM
The California State Attorney General is holding public hearings on the rules California residents want to see implemented under the new CCPA law.
It is scheduled to implement in 2020.
The CCPA is similar to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) of the European Union (EU).
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California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)
Home Privacy California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)

Current Rulemaking Activity

On June 28, 2018, Governor Brown signed Assembly Bill 375, now known as the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, which grants consumers new rights with respect to the collection of their personal information. The California Attorney General’s Office will be promulgating regulations and soliciting broad public participation to further the purposes of the CCPA. The regulations aim to establish procedures to facilitate consumers’ rights under the CCPA and provide guidance to businesses for how to comply.
Notifications Regarding This Rulemaking Process

Information regarding the rulemaking process will be posted on this page. If you would like to receive notifications regarding future rulemaking activities, please subscribe to our email list.
Preliminary Rulemaking Activities: Upcoming Public Forums

The California Attorney General’s Office will hold public forums as part of its preliminary activities in the CCPA rulemaking process. All members of the public are invited to participate and can RSVP to any of the forums on the RSVP form.

Interested persons can also submit written comments via email or by mail to the California Department of Justice, ATTN: Privacy Regulations Coordinator, 300 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, CA 90013. Please submit written comments by March 8, 2019 for consideration during this pre-rulemaking stage. Please note that any information provided is subject to the Public Records Act.
See more (https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/california-privacy-bill_us_5b35c730e4b007aa2f7eb34e)
.
Public Forum PDF (https://www.oag.ca.gov/sites/all/files/agweb/pdfs/privacy/ccpa-public-forum-ppt.pdf)

CasperParks
02-19-2019, 03:56 AM
Click here for article at The Washington Post: With fitness trackers in the workplace, bosses can monitor your every step — and possibly more. (https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/with-fitness-trackers-in-the-workplace-bosses-can-monitor-your-every-step--and-possibly-more/2019/02/15/75ee0848-2a45-11e9-b011-d8500644dc98_story.html?utm_term=.c4d5fa7fbd01)

This is slowly being rolled-out through employers and insurance companies. It is not only tracking and monitoring people at the work-place, it is tracking and monitoring them away from work.

calikid
02-20-2019, 04:51 PM
‘There’s going to be a fight here to weaken it’: Inside the lobbying war over California’s landmark privacy law
By Tony Romm

SACRAMENTO — A landmark law adopted in California last year to rein in the data-collection practices of Facebook, Google and other tech giants has touched off a lobbying blitz that could water it down, potentially undermining new protections that might apply to Internet users across the country.

The fight between regulation-wary businesses and privacy watchdogs centers on the Golden State’s first-in-the-nation online privacy rules, known as the California Consumer Privacy Act. The law, which other states are now trying to mimic, is set to grant people the power to learn what information is collected about them and block it from being sold, while promising tough punishments for companies that mishandle consumers’ most sensitive data.

“People will recognize who’s supposed to be protecting them because right now, [it’s] no one — there’s nobody,” said California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D), whose role overseeing the new law will make him one of the country’s top privacy enforcers.

But the law won’t take effect until next year, creating an opening for lobbying groups representing Facebook, Google and other businesses beyond Silicon Valley to tinker with its guts. The delay has left local policymakers and privacy watchdogs fearful that their signature accomplishment might not remain intact.

Some organizations, including the tech-backed Internet Association and the California Chamber of Commerce, known as CalChamber, are arguing in favor of tweaks that consumer groups contend would limit who the law covers, and how it would work. At a listening session in Sacramento this week, industry leaders said the privacy rules aren’t workable in their current form.

“We’re not rolling back rights; we’re trying to make things work,” Sarah Boot, the chamber’s top privacy policy aide, said in an interview.

California’s race to regulate the tech industry stands in stark contrast to the federal government, where lawmakers long have failed to adopt a national privacy law of their own — even as scandals at Facebook, Google and other tech giants have infuriated Web users and drawn international scorn.
Story Continues (https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/02/08/theres-going-be-fight-here-weaken-it-inside-lobbying-war-over-californias-landmark-privacy-law/)

CasperParks
02-23-2019, 08:27 AM
Click here to read, CBS News: Facebook reportedly received users' sensitive health data from apps: "It’s incredibly dishonest". (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/facebook-reportedly-received-sensitive-health-data-from-apps-without-consent/)
(Notation: The video at CBS covers Facebook. The print article beneath the video is regarding access to personal health.)

Click here to read, The Wall Street Journal: You Give Apps Sensitive Personal Information. Then They Tell Facebook. (https://www.wsj.com/articles/you-give-apps-sensitive-personal-information-then-they-tell-facebook-11550851636)

CasperParks
03-13-2019, 12:11 AM
NBC News article March 12th, 2019: Facial recognition's 'dirty little secret': Millions of online photos scraped without consent, click to read. (https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/internet/facial-recognition-s-dirty-little-secret-millions-online-photos-scraped-n981921)

According the article, IBM and Flickr are involved. It is likely that other tech giants are doing something similar. IBM assured "user could opt out".

Doubtful that people posting photos are aware their images are loaded into a massive database.

Entities with access are "supposedly research groups".

One of the excuses for harvesting photos of individuals is to improve "Facial Recognition" technology.

CasperParks
04-12-2019, 06:50 AM
CBS News reports: Amazon workers are listening to what you tell Alexa, click here to watch report and read article. (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/amazon-workers-are-listening-to-what-you-tell-alexa/)

Something to consider: If using Amazon's Alexa, Microsoft's Cortana, Apple's Siri, and Google Assistance are people allowing "surveillance" of their personal lives?

My portable Bluetooth speaker and tablet have a "virtual assistant" type of thing. I have both Apps "turned-off". Although the Apps appear as if turned-off, are they really turned-off? I wonder what would happen if uninstall was done to the Apps? Would that cause errors on the tablet? For the Bluetooth speaker there isn't an uninstall feature, it is only an "off" type of thing.

CasperParks
07-29-2019, 08:55 PM
Motherboard / Vice: July 29th 2019: Amazon Told Police It Has Partnered With 200 Law Enforcement Agencies... (https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/j5wyjy/amazon-told-police-it-has-partnered-with-200-law-enforcement-agencies)

The article is about "Ring" doorbells from Amazon. Per the article, Amazon is offering special incentives to Law Enforcement. If Law Enforcement promotes "Ring" to their community, they will receive credit toward "free rings" for every "ring" sold in their communities.

There is also a "Ring Neighborhood Watch App"....

A Police and Surveillance State is no longer a future prediction. It hasn't been for many years. "

In the name of public safety" Massive Surveillance will only increase with intensity.

calikid
07-30-2019, 05:40 PM
Motherboard / Vice: July 29th 2019: Amazon Told Police It Has Partnered With 200 Law Enforcement Agencies... (https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/j5wyjy/amazon-told-police-it-has-partnered-with-200-law-enforcement-agencies)

The article is about "Ring" doorbells from Amazon. Per the article, Amazon is offering special incentives to Law Enforcement. If Law Enforcement promotes "Ring" to their community, they will receive credit toward "free rings" for every "ring" sold in their communities.

There is also a "Ring Neighborhood Watch App"....

A Police and Surveillance State is no longer a future prediction. It hasn't been for many years. "

In the name of public safety" Massive Surveillance will only increase with intensity.

The Neighborhood Watch app does not bother me so much. I kind of like knowing if the house three doors down was burglarized last night, reminds me that criminals maybe casing my neighborhood and that I should be keenly aware of personal security.

What does bother me is a recent local news story about the possibly of granting police access to ALL Ring cameras, citywide.
My data, I should have an "Opt Out" option.

calikid
12-02-2019, 12:25 AM
Black Friday sales may not be all good news!.
.
Now even the FBI is warning about your smart TV's security.
By Zack Whittaker.
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If you just bought a smart TV on Black Friday or plan to buy one for Cyber Monday tomorrow, the FBI wants you to know a few things.

Smart TVs are like regular television sets but with an internet connection. With the advent and growth of Netflix, Hulu and other streaming services, most saw internet-connected televisions as a cord-cutter's dream. But like anything that connects to the internet, it opens up smart TVs to security vulnerabilities and hackers. Not only that, many smart TVs come with a camera and a microphone. But as is the case with most other internet-connected devices, manufacturers often don't put security as a priority.

That's the key takeaway from the FBI's Portland field office, which just ahead of some of the biggest shopping days of the year posted a warning on its website about the risks that smart TVs pose.

"Beyond the risk that your TV manufacturer and app developers may be listening and watching you, that television can also be a gateway for hackers to come into your home. A bad cyber actor may not be able to access your locked-down computer directly, but it is possible that your unsecured TV can give him or her an easy way in the backdoor through your router," wrote the FBI.

The FBI warned that hackers can take control of your unsecured smart TV and in worst cases, take control of the camera and microphone to watch and listen in.
Story Continues. (https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/now-even-fbi-warning-smart-194715311.html)

CasperParks
03-07-2020, 08:21 PM
Facebook using "location data" to spy on people: Article at USA Today, click here. (https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2020/03/04/facebook-not-recording-our-calls-but-has-other-ways-snoop/4795519002/)