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Thread: UFOs and Nuclear Sites

  1. #41
    Senior Member Wansen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by calikid View Post

    SNIP

    .... a few others witnesses even went so far as to say their oath to "defend The Constitution of the USA" required them to speak out about UFO secrecy.
    I like this logic!

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by calikid View Post
    Besides the book (which I hope Longeyes will share a quote), there are a few other references as to why witnesses feel free to talk.

    Referencing back to "The Disclosure Project", of whom Schindele was a member a few years before this book was published, many of the interviewed former military members stated their signed security oaths required them to NOT talk about incidents for a fixed period (like 20 or 30 years). Probably Schindele's separation date exceeded that time period, and he was legally free to discuss events without fear of prison and/or of losing his military pension.

    An alternative scenario was illustrated by Penniston, who stated that when the "Halt Memo" was declassified, he was then at liberty to discuss the Rendelsham incident. Perhaps documents relating to the Missiles Incident Schindele discusses were declassified.

    And a few others witnesses even went so far as to say their oath to "defend The Constitution of the USA" required them to speak out about UFO secrecy.
    Thanks Cal. That makes sense and I'm going to watch that Disclosure Project press conference again on You Tube to hear him go into that. I didn't pay attention to that part when I watched it some time ago because I was too shocked and amazed at his testimony about that incident at that base. That's the only thing I was fixated on at that time.
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  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Garuda View Post
    We need a "like" button for posts like these!



    Thanks!
    that would be great

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by A99 View Post
    Thanks Longeyes. It seems to me that years after that incident occurred at that base, the gov't has given this man permission to talk about it to the public. In fact, maybe they even requested that he do that. Does he give any indication in his book that that may have been the case? If you read between the lines in his book, were you able to pick any of that up?

    At any rate, now that he's gone public with that information about what happened there, will others who were also working there at that time come forward to talk about it too in a public venue? Maybe that's already happened but I just don't know about it but, if, in fact, it hasn't happened yet, I wonder why?

    Schindele first went public with it in 2001 at that UFO disclosure press meeting... so the others who were also there at that base have had plenty of time since then to follow suit and talk about it publicly too. If they haven't done that yet, this implies that they were given very explicit information on what would happen to them if they made a public disclosure about that incident or, for that matter, even a private disclosure to family members and close friends.

    Did Schindele go into any detail in his book about that meeting with his superiors and their warnings about what would happen to him if he broke that code of silence about that incident? We can assume that he was also explicitly told not to talk about it to anyone even after he leaves the Air Force. Did he go into that part about that order in his book?

    Why did Schindele decide to go public with that information in the first place? What makes him different than all of the other troops out there who have witnessed UFOs while on duty or have participated in a UFO cover-up who have been ordered to remain silent about it?

    In any case, I think the thing that really boggles my mind is that Schindele's disclosure should have made it as a headline in the front page news, but didn't. It ranks right up there in the 'UFO lands on the White House Lawn' category. It's the kind of proof that everybody has been waiting for since the UFO phenomenon has first been introduced into the public consciousness. It's proof that we are being visited by non-terrestrial intelligence's. Or that there are humans on our planet that have technology that's so advanced, we only read about it in science fiction novels or see in science fiction movies. Yet, for the media, the disclosure of that incident was only relegated to back page news, if at all. Amazing.
    Hi A99
    Sorry for the late reply been on a meditation retreat for a couple of weeks.
    He never says anything like that at all. For him its down to his conscience he feels people have a right to know this. He's not doing this for the government as far as I can make out he's doing it on his own.
    What's special about him it his belief that we all have a right to know. As he says a lot of ex-USAF and Military witnesses live in hope that the government is going to disclose this stuff so they don't have to. But after 30yrs he's come to the conclusion they won't and that keeping such a monumental truth from humanity is a crime in itself.
    Last edited by Longeyes; 07-22-2017 at 12:51 PM.

  5. #45
    This sums his views up I think pretty well...
    From p83 of his book

    It was easy for the Air Force to maintain secrecy about incidents. It simply issued immediate and strict orders to those involved to remain silent. Everyone connected with our missile wing had a security clearance, and everyone knew it was imperative to keep one's mouth shut, not just with classified material, but also with verbal orders to keep silent. Failure to do so would spell the end of one's career, or worse. In some cases, we were simply told by a superior officer to zip lips. In other cases, it was necessary to sign a document swearing an oath of silence. In a majority of cases, the order for silence came down from the local Air Force Office of Special Investigations. It was usually delivered by someone dressed in civilian clothes with a badge under his coat, or in his wallet, or by a phone call.

    So it was with me. I was told upon arriving topside from our underground LCC that I was to forget everything. I was to never say another word about the incident. Being instructed that "It Never Happened" was dismaying, but I had my orders, and I was proud of my integrity in being honorable and trustworthy. I never questioned the order, except to ask where it came from (the OSI). It would have been imprudent for me to challenge it further, since I valued my career and status. I never questioned what kind of security classification the incident had, and I was never told what the security classification was. I assumed of course that it was super sensitive, but I was never told whether it was secret, top secret, or exactly what it was all about, or why my commander and I were to pretend it never happened. That is why I continued to hold the secret for almost forty years, and long after I separated from the Air Force. That is why so many others did the same, and continue to do so. After a while, as the Air Force must have hoped, the incidents would become old lost memories. They did become old, but not lost.

    Moral Responsibility

    To be realistic, it's the aspect of not being "truthful' that has been bothersome in later years. There is always the conundrum of keeping true to a secret, but what if that secret involves a lie? You then ask yourself whether you have really been truthful, or have enabled perpetration of a lie toward society and the whole human community. How long can you assist in hiding a lie that would be of monumental interest to the scientific establishment, and to all of humankind? It then becomes a question of balancing moral responsibility toward a greater cause.

    I have always held my government in highest regard, and respect. I fly the flag, my patriotism is beyond question, and I continue to participate with the national Air Force Association, which has a goal of promoting and advocating for strong national defense and a strong United States Air Force. I thoroughly enjoyed Air Force life and the camaraderie that came with it. I worked with very respectable, conscientious, and competent people who possessed high moral values and who worked hard to serve the Air Force in the best way they could. They all possessed college degrees, and were working to further their education. They were regular, normal Americans who were serious in their work ethic, and dedicated to home, family, friends, and their nation. Granted, this may not necessarily be a general characterization of many in the Air Force, but it certainly was in my experience, and the environment I was part of...

    P85 ...When I and fellow missileers went "on-alert" in our Minuteman Launch Control Centers, with our finger on the nuclear trigger, we showed our teeth of deterrence, and we had no doubt that any would-be aggressor posing a threat to our existence would regret it. But our intent was to let world peace and freedom reign, and that is what we definitely preferred.

    When I was told to never utter another word about my incident, I maintained trustworthiness in that regard. I didn't speak another word. I didn't speak to my commander again about it. I didn't talk to my wife about it. I talked to no one, because doing so was off limits. That is the way it had to be, even though flash-back memories of my incident would continue to haunt me for many years afterward. That's the way it was for many former Air Force officers who are now speaking to the Truth, and that is the way it remains for many who are still reluctant to do so.

    The aspect of truthfulness, however, has come to my attention in the last few years when I learned that some Air Force officers, and other very reputable people, were speaking up about incidents they harbored quietly for many years. The incident experienced by Robert Salas became a tremendous grand awakening for me after some thirty-five years, and it made me realize that Truth was overdue. A long protected lie needed to be brought into the open.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Wansen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longeyes View Post
    This sums his views up I think pretty well...
    From p83 of his book

    It was easy for the Air Force to maintain secrecy about incidents. It simply issued immediate and strict orders to those involved to remain silent. Everyone connected with our missile wing had a security clearance, and everyone knew it was imperative to keep one's mouth shut, not just with classified material, but also with verbal orders to keep silent. Failure to do so would spell the end of one's career, or worse. In some cases, we were simply told by a superior officer to zip lips. In other cases, it was necessary to sign a document swearing an oath of silence. In a majority of cases, the order for silence came down from the local Air Force Office of Special Investigations. It was usually delivered by someone dressed in civilian clothes with a badge under his coat, or in his wallet, or by a phone call.

    So it was with me. I was told upon arriving topside from our underground LCC that I was to forget everything. I was to never say another word about the incident. Being instructed that "It Never Happened" was dismaying, but I had my orders, and I was proud of my integrity in being honorable and trustworthy. I never questioned the order, except to ask where it came from (the OSI). It would have been imprudent for me to challenge it further, since I valued my career and status. I never questioned what kind of security classification the incident had, and I was never told what the security classification was. I assumed of course that it was super sensitive, but I was never told whether it was secret, top secret, or exactly what it was all about, or why my commander and I were to pretend it never happened. That is why I continued to hold the secret for almost forty years, and long after I separated from the Air Force. That is why so many others did the same, and continue to do so. After a while, as the Air Force must have hoped, the incidents would become old lost memories. They did become old, but not lost.

    Moral Responsibility

    To be realistic, it's the aspect of not being "truthful' that has been bothersome in later years. There is always the conundrum of keeping true to a secret, but what if that secret involves a lie? You then ask yourself whether you have really been truthful, or have enabled perpetration of a lie toward society and the whole human community. How long can you assist in hiding a lie that would be of monumental interest to the scientific establishment, and to all of humankind? It then becomes a question of balancing moral responsibility toward a greater cause.

    I have always held my government in highest regard, and respect. I fly the flag, my patriotism is beyond question, and I continue to participate with the national Air Force Association, which has a goal of promoting and advocating for strong national defense and a strong United States Air Force. I thoroughly enjoyed Air Force life and the camaraderie that came with it. I worked with very respectable, conscientious, and competent people who possessed high moral values and who worked hard to serve the Air Force in the best way they could. They all possessed college degrees, and were working to further their education. They were regular, normal Americans who were serious in their work ethic, and dedicated to home, family, friends, and their nation. Granted, this may not necessarily be a general characterization of many in the Air Force, but it certainly was in my experience, and the environment I was part of...

    P85 ...When I and fellow missileers went "on-alert" in our Minuteman Launch Control Centers, with our finger on the nuclear trigger, we showed our teeth of deterrence, and we had no doubt that any would-be aggressor posing a threat to our existence would regret it. But our intent was to let world peace and freedom reign, and that is what we definitely preferred.

    When I was told to never utter another word about my incident, I maintained trustworthiness in that regard. I didn't speak another word. I didn't speak to my commander again about it. I didn't talk to my wife about it. I talked to no one, because doing so was off limits. That is the way it had to be, even though flash-back memories of my incident would continue to haunt me for many years afterward. That's the way it was for many former Air Force officers who are now speaking to the Truth, and that is the way it remains for many who are still reluctant to do so.

    The aspect of truthfulness, however, has come to my attention in the last few years when I learned that some Air Force officers, and other very reputable people, were speaking up about incidents they harbored quietly for many years. The incident experienced by Robert Salas became a tremendous grand awakening for me after some thirty-five years, and it made me realize that Truth was overdue. A long protected lie needed to be brought into the open.
    Sounds like the words of a true Patriot to me.

  7. #47
    Hi Longeyes, thanks for answering some of my questions and can't wait to read your most recent post here which I will do after I get back from running a few errands.
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    For it is in giving that we receive.
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  8. #48
    Just reading his chapters about Roswell.
    He may have started out a skeptic but he is obviously well versed in all the literature. His breakdown of the whereabouts of all the high level individuals is very involved.
    He's read everything about Roswell.

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