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Thread: Emerging Surveillance State?

  1. #521
    Familial DNA to solve crimes is a difficult issue to navigate. Below video explains how Familial DNA was used inside of a criminal data base. In the below cases, Familiar DNA was discovered within criminal data bases. It is worth noting, that an arrest in many States for anything results with DNA gathered and placed into a criminal data base. When someone was found innocent, there have been legal battles to have that DNA and removed from a Criminal Data Base.


    Familiar DNA searches have not been restricted to Criminal DNA Data Bases. Law enforcement has used types of "open warrants" to search for Familiar DNA within Private Data Bases. For example; someone paid for an ancestry study to learn what nationalities or heritage is in their bloodline. Using "open warrants", law enforcement has searched for Familiar DNA in Private Data Bases.

    While everyone was distracted by crazy headlines the following legislation was introduced H.R.1313 - Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act, click here to view legislation. It is reported that all Democrats voted against it, however enough Republicans voted in favor of it...

    H.R.1313 - Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act allows employers to gather DNA from employees, and punish employees refusing to provide it.

    Suggested reading, Washington Post article titled Employees who decline genetic testing could face penalties under proposed bill by clicking here.

    We know that law enforcement has used "open warrants" to search Private DNA Data Bases. Who is to say these "employer" DNA Data Bases are safe from abuse? Also, does an employer really need to have an employees DNA? They claim it is for "healthcare reasons", insurance costs....

    Familiar DNA searches of Criminal Data Bases is an entirely different beast.

    Finger Printing was first brought into play for crimes only, then expanded to required at birth in many States, and many States require Finger Prints for a State issued ID. Go into a bank to cash a check, and the check is drawn from that bank, many banks require your ID (understandable) and a Finger Print.

    How far away are we from States requiring DNA at birth, and DNA for State Issued IDs?

    DNA is very different from Finger Prints.

    DNA is a person's genetic make-up.
    Last edited by CasperParks; 05-31-2017 at 10:19 PM.

  2. #522
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CasperParks View Post
    Familial DNA to solve crimes is a difficult issue to navigate. Below video explains how Familial DNA was used inside of a criminal data base. In the below cases, Familiar DNA was discovered within criminal data bases. It is worth noting, that an arrest in many States for anything results with DNA gathered and placed into a criminal data base. When someone was found innocent, there have been legal battles to have that DNA and removed from a Criminal Data Base.

    [CENTER]Familial DNA Cracks Case

    SNIP Video

    Familiar DNA searches have not been restricted to Criminal DNA Data Bases. Law enforcement has used types of "open warrants" to search for Familiar DNA within Private Data Bases. For example; someone paid for an ancestry study to learn what nationalities or heritage is in their bloodline. Using "open warrants", law enforcement has searched for Familiar DNA in Private Data Bases.

    While everyone was distracted by crazy headlines the following legislation was introduced H.R.1313 - Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act, click here to view legislation. It is reported that all Democrats voted against it, however enough Republicans voted in favor of it...

    H.R.1313 - Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act allows employers to gather DNA from employees, and punish employees refusing to provide it.

    Suggested reading, Washington Post article titled Employees who decline genetic testing could face penalties under proposed bill by clicking here.

    We know that law enforcement has used "open warrants" to search Private DNA Data Bases. Who is to say these "employer" DNA Data Bases are safe from abuse? Also, does an employer really need to have an employees DNA? They claim it is for "healthcare reasons", insurance costs....

    Familiar DNA searches of Criminal Data Bases is an entirely different beast.

    Finger Printing was first brought into play for crimes only, then expanded to required at birth in many States, and many States require Finger Prints for a State issued ID. Go into a bank to cash a check, and the check is drawn from that bank, many banks require your ID (understandable) and a Finger Print.

    How far away are we from States requiring DNA at birth, and DNA for State Issued IDs?

    DNA is very different from Finger Prints.

    DNA is a person's genetic make-up.
    Beyond the "why" about keeping DNA of a person who is determined to be innocent in a criminal database, is the broader question of police asking a person "Do you have any brothers or cousins?"
    If the person being questioned is a convict, and DNA evidence shows a familia match, should he be forced to disclose? Is it "obstruction" if he refuses to answer?
    Does the relative (suspect based on a partial DNA match) have a reasonable expectation of privacy, if he never consented to a DNA sample submission?
    Police still need the relative's DNA sample for a conclusive match, or to "prove you're innocent".
    While it may sound like a gray area/fishing expedition, seems to be SOP for police investigations.

    Note: I get repeated requests from my HMO to participate in DNA studies. No thank you. Prefer to avoid being dragged into "7 degrees of separation" situation.
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  3. #523
    Q&A: Internet extremism and how to combat it


    Washington Post - ‎1 hour ago‎





    DETROIT - In the wake of Britain's third major attack in three months, Prime Minister Theresa May called on internet companies to do more to block extremist groups who use the web to recruit members and send coded messages.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/busin...b2e_story.html

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    For it is in giving that we receive.
    ~ St. Francis of Assisi

  4. #524
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A99 View Post
    Q&A: Internet extremism and how to combat it


    Washington Post - ‎1 hour ago‎





    DETROIT - In the wake of Britain's third major attack in three months, Prime Minister Theresa May called on internet companies to do more to block extremist groups who use the web to recruit members and send coded messages.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/busin...b2e_story.html

    Can't help but feel sorry for the ISPs. Here are guys working hard and just trying to make a living delivering internet access to the masses, and politicians are indicting them for "not doing enough to battle terrorists".

    You'd think with all the Billion$ the politicians get from taxes, they could get a handle on things without throwing hard working (Tax paying) companies under the bus. For-profit companies; how do they justify to their share holders the added expense? How much profit do they sacrifice?

    For the longest time agencies like the FTC, FCC, etc., protected my privacy rights, against the likes of Telco companies.
    Now days, companies like Apple are fighting the FBI for consumer privacy protection.

    Strange times we live in.
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  5. #525
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Can't even buy a printer these days without the governement installing snooping attachments.
    Don't recall seeing "Government Surveillance" option under the list of features.


    WHY PRINTERS ADD SECRET TRACKING DOTS
    By Chris Baraniuk

    On 3 June, FBI agents arrived at the house of government contractor Reality Leigh Winner in Augusta, Georgia. They had spent the last two days investigating a top secret classified document that had allegedly been leaked to the press. In order to track down Winner, agents claim they had carefully studied copies of the document provided by online news site The Intercept and noticed creases suggesting that the pages had been printed and “hand-carried out of a secured space”.

    In an affidavit, the FBI alleges that Winner admitted printing the National Security Agency (NSA) report and sending it to The Intercept. Shortly after a story about the leak was published, charges against Winner were made public.

    At that point, experts began taking a closer look at the document, now publicly available on the web. They discovered something else of interest: yellow dots in a roughly rectangular pattern repeated throughout the page. They were barely visible to the naked eye, but formed a coded design. After some quick analysis, they seemed to reveal the exact date and time that the pages in question were printed: 06:20 on 9 May, 2017 – at least, this is likely to be the time on the printer’s internal clock at that moment. The dots also encode a serial number for the printer.

    These “microdots” are well known to security researchers and civil liberties campaigners. Many colour printers add them to documents without people ever knowing they’re there.

    In this case, the FBI has not said publicly that these microdots were used to help identify their suspect, and the bureau declined to comment for this article. The US Department of Justice, which published news of the charges against Winner, also declined to provide further clarification.

    In a statement, The Intercept said, “Winner faces allegations that have not been proven. The same is true of the FBI’s claims about how it came to arrest Winner.”

    But the presence of microdots on what is now a high-profile document (against the NSA’s wishes) has sparked great interest.

    “Zooming in on the document, they were pretty obvious,” says Ted Han at cataloguing platform Document Cloud, who was one of the first to notice them. “It is interesting and notable that this stuff is out there.”

    Another observer was security researcher Rob Graham, who published a blog post explaining how to identify and decode the dots.
    Story Continues



    HP Printed document, as seen under a blue light:
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  6. #526
    December 9th, 2014:

    Quote Originally Posted by CasperParks View Post
    What is with the “selfie craze”?

    News outlets, corporations, social networking sites are pushing that “selfie thing" and it you are not doing it you are not hip...

    Has anyone noticed mentions of it on the news at least once a week, and those ads on TV promoting a product in conjunction with taking a selfie?

    Is there an organized effort “coaching people” into posting their faces on the internet?

    I have three words: Facial Recognition Software
    Below is a paraphrased version of what I wrote at TOP, and stated on radio:

    "Was the selfie craze designed by the Police and Surveillance State to expand a facial recognition database," Casper Parks...

    I am on record of having mentioned the Selfie Craze and Surveillance here at the OutPost Forum December 2014. Also, was stated in another post last year at TOP.

    Versions of what I wrote at TOP and stated on radio are being used in memes on the internet.

    If someone wants to create a meme of it, that is cool... At this point, I doubt people know where it came from...

    When quoting someone, it is proper to them credit for it.

    Unless someone can point to documentation that another person stated at it first, I am laying claim to it...

    Thank-you,

    Casper Parks...
    Last edited by CasperParks; 06-29-2017 at 05:20 PM.

  7. #527
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CasperParks View Post
    December 9th, 2014:



    When quoting someone, it is proper to them credit for it.

    Below is a paraphrased version of what I wrote:

    "Was the selfie craze designed by the Police and Surveillance State to expand a facial recognition database," Casper Parks...

    I am on record of having mentioned the Selfie Craze and Surveillance here at the OutPost Forum December 2014, and on radio. Also, was stated in another post last year at TOP.

    Versions of what I said on radio and wrote at TOP are being used in memes on the internet.

    If someone wants to create a meme of it, that is cool... At this point, I doubt people know where it came from...

    Unless someone can point to documentation that another person stated at it first, I am laying claim to it...

    Thank-you,

    Casper Parks...

    Not sure I follow Casper.
    Are you laying claim to a specific phrase?
    Or the general idea of Government coercion, to get ppl to unwittingly surrender up their photos/biometrics?

    I'm thinking Snowden, back in 2013, had a similar flavor.
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  8. #528
    Quote Originally Posted by calikid View Post
    Not sure I follow Casper.
    Are you laying claim to a specific phrase?
    Or the general idea of Government coercion, to get ppl to unwittingly surrender up their photos/biometrics?

    I'm thinking Snowden, back in 2013, had a similar flavor.
    Replied in my Spotlight, click here for thread.
    Last edited by CasperParks; 06-29-2017 at 08:13 PM.

  9. #529
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Our local US Post Office began a new service this month.
    With the theft of mail on the rise, used for identity theft, we are now able to sign up for this interesting service.
    I did.
    Now, every morning, I get an email from them showing a JPEG of the front of each and every piece of mail that will be delivered to my house that day.
    Wonder if anyone else gets to see copies?
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  10. #530
    Quote Originally Posted by calikid View Post
    Our local US Post Office began a new service this month.
    With the theft of mail on the rise, used for identity theft, we are now able to sign up for this interesting service.
    I did.
    Now, every morning, I get an email from them showing a JPEG of the front of each and every piece of mail that will be delivered to my house that day.
    Wonder if anyone else gets to see copies?
    I recall reading about that service at one of the mainstream media outlets.

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