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Thread: Electronic Frontier Foundation

  1. #41
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Issue 727.
    Dec. 1, 2017.



    A Lump of Coal in the Internet’s Stocking: FCC Poised to Gut Net Neutrality Rules

    Before the Thanksgiving weekend, the Federal Communications Commission released a plan to gut net neutrality protections. The plan will eliminate the rules that prevent major ISPs from blocking and throttling Internet traffic and setting up pay-to-play structures. In place of those protections, the FCC proposed a mere transparency requirement, allowing ISPs to impose non-neutral practices, as long as they are open about it.

    These changes will upend the Internet as we have come to learn, use, and inhabit it. For years, the Internet operated as an equal playing field for major companies, small business owners, hobbyists and anyone else who simply wanted to start or use a website. By removing these rules, the FCC will allow ISPs to enact "fast lanes" on the Internet, where certain websites can be favored over others. One way companies could access those fast lanes is simple: pay more.

    Under the new rules, companies that have the most money could pay their way into having their content delivered more quickly. Startups, and smaller websites or apps, will be at a disadvantage.

    The best way to help protect the open web is to call and contact your representatives. If you want, you can also take part in various, country-wide events planned for December 7. Help today: speak up.

    EFF Updates
    Power-Up Campaign

    For a limited time, all donations made to EFF as part of its Power-Up Your Donation campaign will be matched! That means, simply, when you donate $1, EFF receives $2. Donate $2? That becomes $4. And donate $100? Well, okay, you get the idea.

    But this double-donation duration only lasts until EFF receives $203,137. We have until December 5 to meet that goal. Every donation helps our organization build privacy-enhancing tools, stop illegal government surveillance, fight censorship, protect the open web, and more.

    Who Has Your Back in Colombia? Karisma's Report Shows Progress

    Working in cooperation with EFF, Fundación Karisma released its third annual ¿Dónde Estan Mis Datos? Report, the Columbian parallel to EFF's Who Has Your Back? The report, which shows some progress in companies that are standing up for their users, is more thorough in its evaluation than years prior. Fundación Karisma reviewed mobile and fixed ISPs on their data practices, as well as corporate policies for gender equality and accessibility, public data breach responses, and HTTPS use.

    Why We’re Helping The Stranger Unseal Electronic Surveillance Records

    EFF is representing the Pulitzer-prize winning newspaper The Stranger to better understand what the government requests from technology companies when seeking user data, and under what legal authorities those requests allegedly apply. The Seattle-based newspaper has petitioned a local, federal court to unseal government requests for electronic surveillance made to some of the region's largest companies, like Amazon and Microsoft.

    EFF’s Street-Level Surveillance Project Dissects Police Technology

    EFF is proud to announce the latest update to its Street-Level Surveillance project. The latest update includes information and documentation about invasive forms of police surveillance, including automated license plate readers, body-worn cameras, cell-site simulators, drones, and face recognition. These pieces of technology can be found almost everywhere today—on street lamps, on highway overpasses, in cop cars, and in the sky. Learn about who is collecting your data, what they're using it for, and how EFF is fighting it.

    Panopticlick 3.0

    EFF released a new version of Panopticlick, a website we developed to help users understand what their Internet browsers know about them. The update includes a test for "Acceptable Ads," an initiative led by Adblock Plus and Adblock to better define non-invasive advertisements. This update led to a retooled privacy policy for Panopticlick. For more information about the updated policy, visit https://panopticlick.eff.org/privacy

    Announcing the Security Education Companion

    EFF launched its Security Education Companion-a set of tools, training manuals and instructions for people who want to teach their communities about digital privacy and security. These resources can empower people to better teach and train some of the trickier, more nuanced topics in cybersecurity, including password creation and management, end-to-end encrypted communications, social media protection, and private Internet browsing.

    Court Rules That EFF’s Stupid Patent of the Month Award Is Protected Speech

    A federal judge decided that EFF did not need to follow an Australian injunction that ordered us to take down a "Stupid Patent of the Month" blog post. The injunction also barred EFF from speaking about the patent owner's intellectual property ever again. The patent owner, Global Equity Management (SA) Pty Ltd, alleged that EFF published "false and malicious slander." EFF countersued in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, arguing that the post is protected speech. The court agreed. The post remains.

    NSA Internet Surveillance Under Section 702 Violates the First Amendment

    Often, constitutional arguments against Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act focus on the Fourth Amendment-the right to freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. But the First Amendment plays an equally important role. In its broadness, NSA surveillance chills speech, assembly, and association.

    miniLinks

    The NSA Caught a Navy Officer Illegally Attempting to Search an American’s Phone

    The potential security lapse begs the question: How many other times have NSA agents and contractors misused powerful government spying tools for personal reasons? (Buzzfeed)

    Most Recent Mac OS Has Enormous Security Flaw

    Users found a glaring security problem in MacOS High Sierra, allowing anyone to log into a High Sierra device without needing a password. Apple has since fixed the problem. (CNET)

    New Orleans Installs 24/7 Surveillance Center

    New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu revealed a high-tech office designed to collect information from surveillance cameras and automated license plate readers located throughout the city. (The New Orleans Advocate)

    Brooklyn Judge Rules that Police Need Warrants to Track Suspects’ Cellphones

    Protecting and serving should include identifying and patching vulnerabilities in our infrastructure. Not exploiting them. (The New York Times)


    Reproduction of this publication in electronic media is encouraged. MiniLinks may not represent the views of EFF.

    This newsletter is printed from 100% recycled electrons.
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  2. #42
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Issue 728
    Jan 30, 2018



    An Open Letter to Our Community on Congress’ Vote to Extend NSA Spying

    The Senate has approved a terrible bill to extend Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act—one of the NSA’s most invasive surveillance tools. This vote dealt a significant blow to Americans' Fourth Amendment rights to privacy, and allows for continued, opaque surveillance that hurts Americans and non-U.S. persons abroad for another six years.

    But this fight is far from over. The failure in Congress amplifies the importance of EFF's continued fight against broad, unconstitutional surveillance that is taking place in the courts. Our signature litigation against mass surveillance, Jewel v. NSA, has survived multiple challenges and delays by the government, and the court has scheduled additional document delivery in our favor as early as mid-February.
    .
    Team Internet Is Far From Done: What’s Next For Net Neutrality and How You Can Help

    The Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal net neutrality protections in late November 2017, neglecting the law, the facts, and the voices of millions of Americans.

    Still, we fight. In the coming months, we have several paths towards a better tomorrow. By utilizing the Congressional Review Act, we can continue to put pressure on Congress before the FCC's vote is written into law. In court, multiple public interest groups, state attorneys general, and Congress members are preparing legal challenges against the FCC because of the way it flouted rulemaking procedure. And on a state-by-state basis, politicians and lawmakers are already considering legislation that would require net neutrality.
    .
    EFF Updates

    Dark Caracal: Good News and Bad News


    EFF, together with Lookout, uncovered a previously undetected global malware espionage campaign with possible involvement from a foreign government. In a joint report, we detail how attackers used malicious, fake apps to impersonate popular messaging apps like WhatsApp and Signal.

    The legitimate messaging apps that people use and trust—like Signal and WhatsApp—have not been compromised in any way. Instead, attackers found ways to duplicate these apps and release fake versions of them on the Android mobile platform.

    While many were unaffected by this attack, the attack itself—and how it was distributed online—is a new development in state-sponsored surveillance and malware.
    .
    EFF and ACLU Ask Court to Allow Legal Challenge to Proceed Against Warrantless Searches of Travelers’ Smartphones, Laptops
    EFF and the ACLU filed a legal brief urging a federal judge to hear a lawsuit that involves Fourth Amendment protections for a group of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched—without warrants—at the U.S. border.

    The case, Alasaad v. Nielsen, asks the court to make a decision on whether government agents need warrants before searching electronic devices.

    EFF and ACLU filed the brief in support of the 11 plaintiffs, who are journalists, students, an artist, a NASA engineer, a business owner and a military veteran.
    .
    EFF Supports Stricter Requirements for DNA Collection From Minors

    A new California bill would require cops to obtain judicial approval or parental consent before collecting children's DNA. EFF strongly supports this legislation.

    Current California law includes a massive loophole that allows law enforcement to collect children's DNA in many circumstances so long as that DNA data is not stored in any statewide or federal databases. Should local law enforcement choose to collect children's DNA and store it only within their own database, there are few rules to stop them.

    The new bill, A.B. 1584, would impose the proper restrictions on local law enforcement and help strengthen privacy protections for California's children.
    .
    How to Assess a Vendor’s Data Security

    When your company needs a new piece of software—like a tool that scans and sends sensitive documents, or a program that compiles confidential client information—making a decision can be tough. We have several questions you can ask that will help steer you towards the right products, helping you—and your business—maintain digital privacy and security.
    .
    California Police Chiefs Misrepresent License Plate Privacy Bill

    A California bill that would protect individual privacy is being attacked by state police chiefs who are misrepresenting what the bill does. The bill—S.B. 712—would allow Californians to cover their cars' license plates while their vehicles are parked. Contrary to what state police chiefs say, allowing this practice would not impede Amber Alert investigations or help criminals get away from the police.

    Instead, S.B. 712 would protect Californians from known, invasive surveillance practices, which have included the collection of license plate numbers parked at mosques, gay night clubs, and reproductive health centers.
    .
    Europe’s GDPR Meets WHOIS Privacy: Which Way Forward

    As Europe prepares its General Data Protection Regulation ruleset, the authority on online domain name registrations is grappling with what its own rules will look like in the future.

    Under current practice, ICANN—which oversees website registration information—requires personal information to be listed on publicly accessible sites called WHOIS directories. This flouts some of the privacy restrictions in Europe's GDPR. Before ICANN comes fully up to speed with GDPR compliance, it has issued three interim solutions. While not perfect, EFF supports at least a variation of one of these solutions.
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    miniLinks
    .
    Software developers blunder into a misunderstanding of sexual consent… and blockchain

    A new app asks people to consent to sex with one another by using blockchain technology. (Motherboard)
    .
    Apple is “selling out” to the Communist party in China

    The New York Times writes about Apple's decision to deliver enormous volumes of personal data to the "largest, and one of the harshest, authoritarian regimes in the world: the Communist government in China." (The New York Times)
    .
    The NSA may claim its collection of Americans’ emails is “incidental,” but the scope is enormous.

    Despite what the NSA says, Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act is used to sweep up countless Americans' electronic communications. (Just Security)
    .
    Mapping digital rights violations in Palestine

    A new paper from advocacy organization 7amleh analyzes digital rights violations and threats to Palestinians from their own government. The report also details threats from non-government actors.
    .
    Filipino bloggers organize for the right to free expression

    59 bloggers in the Philippines have issued a manifesto for free speech in the wake of attempts by the government to shut down news site Rappler for criticizing the president. (Rappler)



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    Reproduction of this publication in electronic media is encouraged. MiniLinks may not represent the views of EFF.

    This newsletter is printed from 100% recycled electrons.
    To read more: View as a webpage.
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

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