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Thread: Electronic Frontier Foundation

  1. #71
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Who Has Your Back? - EFFector.
    Issue #756
    June 20, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features

    Who Has Your Back?


    While social media platforms are increasingly giving users the opportunity to appeal decisions to censor their posts, very few platforms comprehensively commit to notifying users that their content has been removed in the first place. That raises questions about accountability and transparency, according to EFF’s 2019 “Who Has Your Back: Censorship Edition” report. There is a wave of new government regulations and actions around the world meant to rid platforms of extremist content, but social media companies and platforms have all too often censored valuable speech in response to calls to remove objectionable content.

    EFF examined the content moderation policies of 16 platforms and app stores, and only four companies—Facebook, Reddit, Apple, and GitHub—commit to notifying users when any content is censored and stating the specific legal request or community guideline violation that led to the removal.

    Congress Should Pass the Protecting Data at the Border Act

    The rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution don’t fade away at the border. And yet the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asserts the power to freely search the electronic devices of travelers before allowing them entrance into, or exit from, the United States. This practice will end if Congress passes the Protecting Data at the Border Act.

    Under the bipartisan Protecting Data at the Border Act, border officers would be required to get a warrant before searching a traveler’s electronic device. Last month, the bill was re-introduced into the U.S. Senate by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.). It is co-sponsored by Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), and the House companion bill is co-sponsored by Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Cal.).
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    EFF Updates
    30 Years Since Tiananmen Square: The State of Chinese Censorship and Digital Surveillance

    The Tiananmen Square protest is one of the most tightly censored topics in China. The Chinese government’s network and social media censorship is more than just pervasive; it’s sloppy, overbroad, inaccurate, and always errs on the side of more takedowns. Every year, the Chinese government ramps up VPN shutdowns, activist arrests, digital surveillance, and social media censorship in anticipation of the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protests. To mark the 30th anniversary, the controls were even tighter.

    Slay Monopolies With an Elegant Weapon From a More Civilized Age

    Scratch the surface of most Big Tech giants and you'll find an adversarial interoperability story: Facebook grew by making a tool that let its users stay in touch with MySpace users; Google products from search to Docs and beyond depend on adversarial interoperability layers; Amazon's cloud is full of virtual machines pretending to be discrete CPUs, impersonating real computers so well that the programs running within them have no idea that they're trapped in the Matrix. Adversarial interoperability converts market dominance from an unassailable asset to a liability. And it is the consumer's bargaining chip against coercive company behavior.

    EFF's Recommendations for Consumer Data Privacy Laws

    Strong privacy legislation in the United States is possible, necessary, and long overdue. EFF emphasizes three concrete recommendations for proposed legislation regarding consumer data privacy. Our biggest priorities are: avoiding federal preemption, ensuring consumers have a private right of action, and using non-discrimination rules to avoid pay-for-privacy schemes. There is a daily drip-drip of bad news about how big tech companies are intruding on our privacy. It is long past time to enact new laws to protect consumer data privacy.
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    MiniLinks
    I’m a Judge. Here’s How Surveillance Is Challenging Our Legal System.

    James Orenstein, a United States magistrate judge, warns that prosecutors are often determining how far the police can go in using technology to invade people’s privacy. “Your privacy is not their highest priority,” he writes. (New York Times Opinion)

    Voters back moratorium on face recognition surveillance in Mass.


    Nearly eight in 10 Massachusetts voters would support a moratorium on government use of face recognition surveillance, according to poll results released June 18. (Boston Globe)



    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
    Donate Today

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    Back issues of EFFector
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  2. #72
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Prevent Copyright Trolling - EFFector 32.11 - EFFector.
    Issue #754
    July 30, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features

    A Bad Copyright Bill Moves Forward With No Serious Understanding of Its Dangers

    The Senate Judiciary Committee voted on the Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act, aka the CASE Act. This was without any hearings for experts to explain the huge flaws in the bill as it’s currently written. And flaws there are.

    The CASE Act creates a quasi-court focused exclusively on copyright with the power to pass judgment on parties in private disputes. It encourages copyright trolling by inviting filing as many copyright claims as one can against ordinary Internet users who can be coerced into paying thousands of dollars to escape the process, whether they infringed copyright or not. Copyright law fundamentally impacts freedom of expression. People shouldn’t be funneled to a system that hands out huge damage awards with less care than a traffic ticket gets.

    Fixed? The FTC Orders Facebook to Stop Using Your 2FA Number for Ads


    Throughout this year, we have been demanding that a handful of companies fix some of their biggest privacy and security problems. For Facebook, we have taken aim at its tendency to use phone numbers for purposes contrary to what users understood or intended. Rather than face a lawsuit from FTC, Facebook agreed to stop the most egregious of these practices—agreeing not to use phone numbers provided for any security feature (like two-factor authentication, account recovery, and login alerts) for targeted advertising purposes.

    But the FTC didn’t go far enough here, and Facebook continues to be able to abuse your phone number in two troubling ways. First, two-factor authentication numbers are still exposed to reverse-lookup searches. Second, the FTC’s settlement misses a whole additional category of phone numbers: “shadow” contact information, which refers to a phone number you never gave Facebook but which your friends uploaded with their contacts. While the FTC’s order may seem like a fix, it does not go far enough for us to consider it a complete victory.

    EFF Updates
    Don’t Let Encrypted Messaging Become a Hollow Promise

    A secure messenger should guarantee that no one but you and your intended recipients can read your messages or otherwise analyze their contents to infer what you are talking about. Any time a messaging app has to add “unless...” to that guarantee, whether in response to legislation or internal policy decisions, it’s a sign that messenger is delivering compromised security to its users. Keeping everyone’s communications safe means making sure we don’t hand over control of our devices to companies, governments, or other third parties.


    Again!? The NSA’s Phone Records Program Still Can’t Stay Within the Law

    Just as the Trump administration has signaled its interest in a permanent “clean” reauthorization of the Patriot Act’s phone surveillance provision, the NSA proves once again that it is not to be trusted with these tools. New documents obtained by the ACLU and reported in the Wall Street Journal have revealed that last year the NSA once again collected phone records of Americans that it was not authorized to obtain. Section 215 is up for re-authorization in December and it's clear that it's time to let the NSA’s permission to sweep up phone records expire. If Section 215 is allowed to be reauthorized, accidents like this—in which an unthinkable amount of our personal data winds up in the hands of the government—will continue to happen.

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    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
    Donate Today

    Reproduction of this publication in electronic media is encouraged.
    MiniLinks may not represent the views of EFF.
    This newsletter is printed from 100% recycled electrons.

    View this Issue in it's entirety.

    Back issues of EFFector
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  3. #73
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Amazon’s Ring Threatens Privacy - EFFector 32.13 - EFFector.
    Issue #756
    Aug 21, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features
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    Amazon’s Ring Is a Perfect Storm of Privacy Threats

    Doors across the United States are now fitted with Amazon’s Ring, a combination doorbell-security camera that records and transmits video straight to users’ phones, to Amazon’s cloud—and often to the local police department. By sending photos and alerts every time the camera detects motion or someone rings the doorbell, the app can create an illusion of a household under siege. Recent reports show that Ring has partnered with police departments across the country to hawk this new surveillance system—going so far as to draft press statements and social media posts for police to promote Ring cameras. This creates a vicious cycle in which police promote the adoption of Ring, Ring terrifies people into thinking their homes are in danger, and then Amazon sells more cameras.

    The rapid proliferation of this partnership between police departments and the Ring surveillance system—without any oversight, transparency, or restrictions—poses a grave threat to the privacy of all people in the community. It also may chill the First Amendment rights of political canvassers and community organizers who spread their messages door-to-door, and contribute to the unfair racial profiling of our minority neighbors and visitors.
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    Opening the Door for Censorship: New Trademark Enforcement Mechanisms Added for Top-Level Domains


    With so much dissatisfaction over how companies like Facebook and YouTube moderate user speech, you might think that the groups that run the Internet’s infrastructure would want to stay far away from the speech-policing business. Sadly, two groups that control an important piece of the Internet’s infrastructure have decided to jump right in.

    The organization that governs the .org top-level domain, known as Public Interest Registry (PIR), and the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) are expanding their role as speech regulators through a new agreement, negotiated behind closed doors. And they’re doing it despite the nearly unanimous opposition of nonprofit and civil society groups—the people who use .org domains. EFF is asking ICANN’s board to reconsider.
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    EFF Updates

    Victory! Lawsuit May Proceed Against Facebook’s Biometric Surveillance


    Biometric surveillance by companies against consumers is a growing menace to our privacy, freedom of expression, and civil rights. Fortunately, a federal appeals court has ruled that a lawsuit against Facebook for its face surveillance may move forward. This is an important victory for biometric privacy, access to the courts for ordinary people, and the role of state governments as guardians of our digital liberty.
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    Victory! California Supreme Court Blocks Sweeping Search Condition of Minors’ Electronic Devices and Social Media Accounts

    The California Supreme Court recently rejected the government’s attempt to require a youth probationer, as a condition of release, to submit to random searches of his electronic devices and social media accounts. EFF and the ACLU filed an amicus brief in the case back in 2016, warning that the search condition imposed here was highly invasive, unconstitutional, and in violation of the California Supreme Court’s own standard for probation conditions. We also warned of the far-reaching privacy implications of allowing courts to impose such broad electronic search conditions. We’re pleased that the California Supreme Court heeded our warnings.
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    MiniLinks

    When Limiting Online Speech to Curb Violence, We Should Be Careful

    America's ongoing problem with mass violence—and the difficulty we are having in quelling it—is causing many to call for the elimination of online forums used by the perpetrators. It is also a critical moment to look closely at what is being proposed and pay attention to the potential consequences for us all. (Wired)





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    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
    Donate Today

    Reproduction of this publication in electronic media is encouraged.
    MiniLinks may not represent the views of EFF.
    This newsletter is printed from 100% recycled electrons.

    View this Issue in it's entirety.

    Back issues of EFFector
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

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