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  1. #71
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Who Has Your Back? - EFFector.
    Issue #756
    June 20, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features

    Who Has Your Back?


    While social media platforms are increasingly giving users the opportunity to appeal decisions to censor their posts, very few platforms comprehensively commit to notifying users that their content has been removed in the first place. That raises questions about accountability and transparency, according to EFF’s 2019 “Who Has Your Back: Censorship Edition” report. There is a wave of new government regulations and actions around the world meant to rid platforms of extremist content, but social media companies and platforms have all too often censored valuable speech in response to calls to remove objectionable content.

    EFF examined the content moderation policies of 16 platforms and app stores, and only four companies—Facebook, Reddit, Apple, and GitHub—commit to notifying users when any content is censored and stating the specific legal request or community guideline violation that led to the removal.

    Congress Should Pass the Protecting Data at the Border Act

    The rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution don’t fade away at the border. And yet the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asserts the power to freely search the electronic devices of travelers before allowing them entrance into, or exit from, the United States. This practice will end if Congress passes the Protecting Data at the Border Act.

    Under the bipartisan Protecting Data at the Border Act, border officers would be required to get a warrant before searching a traveler’s electronic device. Last month, the bill was re-introduced into the U.S. Senate by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.). It is co-sponsored by Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), and the House companion bill is co-sponsored by Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Cal.).
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    EFF Updates
    30 Years Since Tiananmen Square: The State of Chinese Censorship and Digital Surveillance

    The Tiananmen Square protest is one of the most tightly censored topics in China. The Chinese government’s network and social media censorship is more than just pervasive; it’s sloppy, overbroad, inaccurate, and always errs on the side of more takedowns. Every year, the Chinese government ramps up VPN shutdowns, activist arrests, digital surveillance, and social media censorship in anticipation of the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protests. To mark the 30th anniversary, the controls were even tighter.

    Slay Monopolies With an Elegant Weapon From a More Civilized Age

    Scratch the surface of most Big Tech giants and you'll find an adversarial interoperability story: Facebook grew by making a tool that let its users stay in touch with MySpace users; Google products from search to Docs and beyond depend on adversarial interoperability layers; Amazon's cloud is full of virtual machines pretending to be discrete CPUs, impersonating real computers so well that the programs running within them have no idea that they're trapped in the Matrix. Adversarial interoperability converts market dominance from an unassailable asset to a liability. And it is the consumer's bargaining chip against coercive company behavior.

    EFF's Recommendations for Consumer Data Privacy Laws

    Strong privacy legislation in the United States is possible, necessary, and long overdue. EFF emphasizes three concrete recommendations for proposed legislation regarding consumer data privacy. Our biggest priorities are: avoiding federal preemption, ensuring consumers have a private right of action, and using non-discrimination rules to avoid pay-for-privacy schemes. There is a daily drip-drip of bad news about how big tech companies are intruding on our privacy. It is long past time to enact new laws to protect consumer data privacy.
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    MiniLinks
    I’m a Judge. Here’s How Surveillance Is Challenging Our Legal System.

    James Orenstein, a United States magistrate judge, warns that prosecutors are often determining how far the police can go in using technology to invade people’s privacy. “Your privacy is not their highest priority,” he writes. (New York Times Opinion)

    Voters back moratorium on face recognition surveillance in Mass.


    Nearly eight in 10 Massachusetts voters would support a moratorium on government use of face recognition surveillance, according to poll results released June 18. (Boston Globe)



    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
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  2. #72
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Prevent Copyright Trolling - EFFector 32.11 - EFFector.
    Issue #754
    July 30, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features

    A Bad Copyright Bill Moves Forward With No Serious Understanding of Its Dangers

    The Senate Judiciary Committee voted on the Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act, aka the CASE Act. This was without any hearings for experts to explain the huge flaws in the bill as it’s currently written. And flaws there are.

    The CASE Act creates a quasi-court focused exclusively on copyright with the power to pass judgment on parties in private disputes. It encourages copyright trolling by inviting filing as many copyright claims as one can against ordinary Internet users who can be coerced into paying thousands of dollars to escape the process, whether they infringed copyright or not. Copyright law fundamentally impacts freedom of expression. People shouldn’t be funneled to a system that hands out huge damage awards with less care than a traffic ticket gets.

    Fixed? The FTC Orders Facebook to Stop Using Your 2FA Number for Ads


    Throughout this year, we have been demanding that a handful of companies fix some of their biggest privacy and security problems. For Facebook, we have taken aim at its tendency to use phone numbers for purposes contrary to what users understood or intended. Rather than face a lawsuit from FTC, Facebook agreed to stop the most egregious of these practices—agreeing not to use phone numbers provided for any security feature (like two-factor authentication, account recovery, and login alerts) for targeted advertising purposes.

    But the FTC didn’t go far enough here, and Facebook continues to be able to abuse your phone number in two troubling ways. First, two-factor authentication numbers are still exposed to reverse-lookup searches. Second, the FTC’s settlement misses a whole additional category of phone numbers: “shadow” contact information, which refers to a phone number you never gave Facebook but which your friends uploaded with their contacts. While the FTC’s order may seem like a fix, it does not go far enough for us to consider it a complete victory.

    EFF Updates
    Don’t Let Encrypted Messaging Become a Hollow Promise

    A secure messenger should guarantee that no one but you and your intended recipients can read your messages or otherwise analyze their contents to infer what you are talking about. Any time a messaging app has to add “unless...” to that guarantee, whether in response to legislation or internal policy decisions, it’s a sign that messenger is delivering compromised security to its users. Keeping everyone’s communications safe means making sure we don’t hand over control of our devices to companies, governments, or other third parties.


    Again!? The NSA’s Phone Records Program Still Can’t Stay Within the Law

    Just as the Trump administration has signaled its interest in a permanent “clean” reauthorization of the Patriot Act’s phone surveillance provision, the NSA proves once again that it is not to be trusted with these tools. New documents obtained by the ACLU and reported in the Wall Street Journal have revealed that last year the NSA once again collected phone records of Americans that it was not authorized to obtain. Section 215 is up for re-authorization in December and it's clear that it's time to let the NSA’s permission to sweep up phone records expire. If Section 215 is allowed to be reauthorized, accidents like this—in which an unthinkable amount of our personal data winds up in the hands of the government—will continue to happen.

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    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
    Donate Today

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    Back issues of EFFector
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    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
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  3. #73
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Amazon’s Ring Threatens Privacy - EFFector 32.13 - EFFector.
    Issue #756
    Aug 21, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features
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    Amazon’s Ring Is a Perfect Storm of Privacy Threats

    Doors across the United States are now fitted with Amazon’s Ring, a combination doorbell-security camera that records and transmits video straight to users’ phones, to Amazon’s cloud—and often to the local police department. By sending photos and alerts every time the camera detects motion or someone rings the doorbell, the app can create an illusion of a household under siege. Recent reports show that Ring has partnered with police departments across the country to hawk this new surveillance system—going so far as to draft press statements and social media posts for police to promote Ring cameras. This creates a vicious cycle in which police promote the adoption of Ring, Ring terrifies people into thinking their homes are in danger, and then Amazon sells more cameras.

    The rapid proliferation of this partnership between police departments and the Ring surveillance system—without any oversight, transparency, or restrictions—poses a grave threat to the privacy of all people in the community. It also may chill the First Amendment rights of political canvassers and community organizers who spread their messages door-to-door, and contribute to the unfair racial profiling of our minority neighbors and visitors.
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    Opening the Door for Censorship: New Trademark Enforcement Mechanisms Added for Top-Level Domains


    With so much dissatisfaction over how companies like Facebook and YouTube moderate user speech, you might think that the groups that run the Internet’s infrastructure would want to stay far away from the speech-policing business. Sadly, two groups that control an important piece of the Internet’s infrastructure have decided to jump right in.

    The organization that governs the .org top-level domain, known as Public Interest Registry (PIR), and the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) are expanding their role as speech regulators through a new agreement, negotiated behind closed doors. And they’re doing it despite the nearly unanimous opposition of nonprofit and civil society groups—the people who use .org domains. EFF is asking ICANN’s board to reconsider.
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    EFF Updates

    Victory! Lawsuit May Proceed Against Facebook’s Biometric Surveillance


    Biometric surveillance by companies against consumers is a growing menace to our privacy, freedom of expression, and civil rights. Fortunately, a federal appeals court has ruled that a lawsuit against Facebook for its face surveillance may move forward. This is an important victory for biometric privacy, access to the courts for ordinary people, and the role of state governments as guardians of our digital liberty.
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    Victory! California Supreme Court Blocks Sweeping Search Condition of Minors’ Electronic Devices and Social Media Accounts

    The California Supreme Court recently rejected the government’s attempt to require a youth probationer, as a condition of release, to submit to random searches of his electronic devices and social media accounts. EFF and the ACLU filed an amicus brief in the case back in 2016, warning that the search condition imposed here was highly invasive, unconstitutional, and in violation of the California Supreme Court’s own standard for probation conditions. We also warned of the far-reaching privacy implications of allowing courts to impose such broad electronic search conditions. We’re pleased that the California Supreme Court heeded our warnings.
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    MiniLinks

    When Limiting Online Speech to Curb Violence, We Should Be Careful

    America's ongoing problem with mass violence—and the difficulty we are having in quelling it—is causing many to call for the elimination of online forums used by the perpetrators. It is also a critical moment to look closely at what is being proposed and pay attention to the potential consequences for us all. (Wired)





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    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
    Donate Today

    Reproduction of this publication in electronic media is encouraged.
    MiniLinks may not represent the views of EFF.
    This newsletter is printed from 100% recycled electrons.

    View this Issue in it's entirety.

    Back issues of EFFector
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
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  4. #74
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Algorithms Can’t Excuse Discrimination - EFFector 32.15 - EFFector.
    Issue #759
    Oct 11, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features

    Algorithms Can't Excuse Discrimination

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is considering adopting new rules that would effectively insulate landlords, banks, and insurance companies that use algorithmic models from lawsuits that claim their practices have an unjustified discriminatory effect. HUD’s proposal is flawed, and suggests that the agency doesn’t understand how machine learning and other algorithmic tools work in practice. Algorithmic tools are increasingly relied upon to make assessments of tenants’ creditworthiness and risk, and HUD’s proposed rules will make it all but impossible to enforce the Fair Housing Act into the future.

    It’s critically important that HUD hear from a variety of people about the problems their proposal raises. If you share EFF’s concerns, please use the template for comments we’ve drafted to share your concerns, and add your own personal thoughts on why this issue is so important to you.
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    How to Make Sure the Tech You Use and Build Reflects Your Values

    Technology should empower you. It should put you in control. You should not feel used by the company that provides it to you. And if you’re a builder of technologies, we believe you should always carry the responsibility to empower your users. Ultimately you should be able to say that you are proud of what you built.

    But when we regularly see headlines about how technology companies have abused our privacy or provided data for surveillance programs, it’s hard to feel like we’re in control of the technologies we use or build, much less that we have any power to change what is happening in front of us. Yet there are measures we can all take—as employees, contractors and customers—to help push companies toward becoming far better stewards for the powerful technologies they offer to the world.
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    EFF Updates
    The Open Letter from the Governments of US, UK, and Australia to Facebook is An All-Out Attack on Encryption

    Attorney General William Barr and his counterparts in the UK and Australia have sent a letter to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg telling him to abandon plans to embrace end-to-end encryption throughout Facebook messaging platforms. It’s a staggering attempt to undermine the privacy of communications tools used by billions of people, and EFF, along with more than one hundred other civil society groups, has urged Facebook not to comply.
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    European Court’s Decision in Right To Be Forgotten Case is a Win for Free Speech

    In a significant victory for free speech rights, the European Union’s highest court ruled that the EU’s Right to Be Forgotten does not require Google to delist search results globally, thus keeping the results available to be seen by users around the world.

    The EU standard, established in 2014, lets individuals in member states demand that search engines not show search results containing old information about them when their privacy rights outweigh the public’s interest in having continued access to the information.

    Announcements
    International Day Against DRM
    At noon on Saturday October 12, come join a protest against textbook DRM at the Pearson Education building at 501 Boylston Street in Boston. This event is hosted by the Free Software Foundation, not EFF. Every year FSF's campaign Defective by Design Lab organizes the International Day Against DRM (IDAD) to mobilize protests, grassroots activism, and actions against the grave threat of DRM. This year, FSF is calling on Pearson and similar companies to stop putting a lock on our learning, and drop DRM from their electronic textbooks and course materials. Later in the day, FSF is holding a hackathon to create collaborative and DRM-free textbooks.
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    Gone Phishing: How to Recognize Fake Websites and Other Online Scams

    On Saturday Oct. 12, Brooklyn's Tech Learning Collective invites you to join us for a combination "attack/defense" exercise focused on Web-based social engineering attacks. Participants will practice both how to launch their own attacks as well as how to defend against them. RSVPs are requested, and sliding scale registration is available.
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    MiniLinks
    Tech Companies Are Quietly Phasing Out a Major Privacy Safeguard

    More and more companies are failing to issue transparency reports to tell consumers how much of their information governments have demanded. (The Atlantic)
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    Secret F.B.I. Subpoenas Scoop Up Personal Data From Scores of Companies

    The F.B.I. has used secret subpoenas to obtain personal data from far more companies than previously disclosed, newly released documents show. (New York Times)

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    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
    Donate Today

    Reproduction of this publication in electronic media is encouraged.
    MiniLinks may not represent the views of EFF.
    This newsletter is printed from 100% recycled electrons.

    View this Issue in it's entirety.

    Back issues of EFFector
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  5. #75
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Don’t Break Encryption - EFFector 32.16 - EFFector.
    Issue #760
    Nov 6, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features
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    Don’t Break Encryption


    Client-side scanning might seem like a way to screen out harmful content without breaking end-to-end encryption. But unfortunately, it’s not that simple. It's impossible to build client-side scanning without creating a censorship mechanism. As part of a messaging app, software would scan your message and check it against a database of “hashes,” or unique digital fingerprints, usually of images or videos to filter out harmful content. While it may technically maintain some properties of end-to-end encryption, client-side scanning would render the user privacy and security guarantees of encryption hollow. As a consequence, even a well-intentioned effort to build such a system will break key promises of a messenger’s encryption itself and open the door to broader abuses. Encryption is one of the best tools for people to assure their privacy from government and corporate actors.
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    Facebook Faces Another Congressional Grilling

    Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg was called back to Capitol Hill to speak about the company’s impact on the financial and housing sectors—particularly in light of its proposal to launch a cryptocurrency wallet, Calibra, and its involvement in the creation of the Libra cryptocurrency. We’ve criticized Facebook on many fronts for years, and we share the wide ranging concerns of lawmakers who want to ensure their constituents’ privacy and rights are protected from Facebook’s abuses as it looks to expand its reach.
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    The House Votes in Favor of Disastrous Copyright Bill


    The House of Representatives has voted in favor of the Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act (CASE Act) by 410-6 (with 16 members not voting). The CASE Act creates a new body in the Copyright Office which will receive copyright complaints, notify the person being sued, and then decide if money is owed and how much. This new Copyright Claims Board will be able to fine people up to $30,000 per proceeding. Worse, if you get one of these notices (maybe an email, maybe a letter—the law actually does not specify) and accidentally ignore it, you’re on the hook for the money with a very limited ability to appeal.
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    EFF Updates
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    China’s Global Reach: Surveillance and Censorship Beyond the Great Firewall

    With the ongoing protests in Hong Kong, mainland China has been undertaking pervasive attempts to disrupt and discredit the movement globally. This has including attempts to extend its so-called "Great Firewall"—a system of surveillance and blocking technology that prevents Chinese citizens from viewing websites outside the country—beyond its own borders.
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    Why Fiber is Vastly Superior to Cable and 5G
    By every measurement, fiber connections to homes and businesses are, by far, the superior choice for the 21st century. It is not even close. Transitioning the “last mile” into fiber will require a massive effort from industry and government—an effort the rest of the world has already started.
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    Secret Court Rules That the FBI’s “Backdoor Searches” of Americans Violated the Fourth Amendment

    A series of newly unsealed rulings from the federal district and appellate courts tasked with overseeing foreign surveillance show that the FBI has been unable to comply with even modest oversight rules Congress placed on “backdoor searches” of Americans by the FBI. Instead, the Bureau routinely abuses its ability to search through this NSA-collected information for purposes unrelated to Section 702’s intended national security purposes.
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    MiniLinks
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    You’re in a Police Lineup, Right Now

    As part of the New York Times’ Privacy Project, Clare Garvie of the Georgetown Center on Privacy and Technology explains the harms of face recognition.
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    The FBI is Still Spying on Dissent

    A new report from Defending Rights & Dissent discusses political espionage conducted by the FBI in recent years and connect that to the Bureau’s longer history of surveillance against activists.
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    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
    Donate Today

    Reproduction of this publication in electronic media is encouraged.
    MiniLinks may not represent the views of EFF.
    This newsletter is printed from 100% recycled electrons.

    View this Issue in it's entirety.

    Back issues of EFFector
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  6. #76
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation.
    Help EFF Challenge Ring Spokesperson Shaq Over Privacy Concerns - EFFector 32.17 - EFFector.
    Issue #761
    Nov 22, 2019 VIEW AS WEBPAGE
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    Top Features
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    Help EFF Challenge Ring Spokesperson Shaq Over Privacy Concerns


    We’re challenging Ring spokesperson Shaq to a one-on-one: not on the basketball court, but across the table, so we can discuss with him how the ubiquitous surveillance facilitated by Ring and its privacy-invasive partnerships with police can harm communities. Amazon and Ring have either ignored or dismissed the growing concerns among privacy experts, activists, and communities about the rapidly expanding number of partnerships between Ring and law enforcement. Two months ago, there were under 300; currently, the number has grown to well over 600.
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    Major Victory for Travelers' Privacy at the Border

    A federal judge has ruled that suspicionless searches of travelers’ electronic cell phones, laptops, and other electronic devices at the U.S. border are unconstitutional. This enormous win in our Alasaad v. McAleenan case will help ensure that federal agents at international airports and other U.S. ports of entry cannot turn international travel into an excuse to rifle through your private digital information without individualized suspicion. EFF fought for tech users for years before arriving at the latest victory in Alasaad, and this won’t be the last battle. Donate to EFF today and continue to protect the future of civil liberties, wherever technology leads us.
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    EFF Updates
    House Lawmakers Extend Section 215 into Next Year Even Though They Had Years to Stop Illegal Overcollection of Americans’ Sensitive Data

    With federal agencies set to run out of money this week, House lawmakers passed a short-term funding bill that contained a nasty surprise. Tucked into the end of this must-pass legislation, in a section titled “Other Matters,” is language reauthorizing three Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) authorities currently set to expire on December 15, 2019. The new expiration date would be March 15, 2020. The extension of these surveillance authorities, even for three months, is bad enough. Hiding the language in the back of a must-pass funding bill shows a patent disregard for the importance of this issue.
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    The Council of Europe Shouldn’t Throw Out Our Privacy Rights Just to Speed Up Police Access

    Foreign police often want to investigate a crime by gathering potential evidence from Internet companies located in another country. What if police in Poland want to get a user’s data from an ISP in Germany, Philippines, Japan—or vice versa? Can they do this? Under what rules, and with what kind of oversight?
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    MiniLinks
    Police can keep Ring camera video forever and share with whomever they’d like, Amazon tells senator

    Police officers who download videos captured by homeowners’ Ring doorbell cameras can keep them forever and share them with whomever they’d like without providing evidence of a crime, the Amazon-owned firm told a lawmaker this month.
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    Moscow’s Campaign against facial recognition

    Russian organization Roskomsvoboda and a Russian civil rights attorney have launched a lawsuit, petition, and public campaign to get a moratorium on the Russian government's use of face recognition.

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    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading organization protecting civil liberties in the digital world. Founded in 1990, we defend free speech online, fight illegal surveillance, promote the rights of digital innovators, and work to ensure that the rights and freedoms we enjoy are enhanced, rather than eroded, as our use of technology grows. EFF is a member-supported organization. Find out more at https://eff.org.

    .EFF is Supported By Donors.
    Donate Today

    Reproduction of this publication in electronic media is encouraged.
    MiniLinks may not represent the views of EFF.
    This newsletter is printed from 100% recycled electrons.

    View this Issue in it's entirety.

    Back issues of EFFector
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

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