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Thread: Spot light on Lockheed Martin

  1. #1

    Spot light on Lockheed Martin

    Lockheed Martin are at the cutting head of technology in the world right now and will post in here some of the stuff they are up to

    Their hot fusion claims are incredible especially if you have read anything about NIF it cost $3.5 billion this research will be a fraction of that

    http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/pro...ct-fusion.html


  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Longeyes View Post
    Lockheed Martin are at the cutting head of technology in the world right now and will post in here some of the stuff they are up to

    Their hot fusion claims are incredible especially if you have read anything about NIF it cost $3.5 billion this research will be a fraction of that

    http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/pro...ct-fusion.html

    sounds more like the costs to bring this technology out of the black and into the grey world of labs & academia. Scrubbing and recreating the background history of the various aspects behind this technology.
    that and the fact that it is compact and not the size of a warehouse is quite interesting, because it makes transferable to transport type technologies. It also indicates they may have had this technology for many many years and have gone thru multiple iterations already, which is usually the case when tech gets miniaturized.

    100 MWs on a truck may also point to the possibility of human transportable 1-5 MW laser weapons, or 10-20 MW howitzer type laser cannons or tank/armor mounted lasers.

    Maybe Lockheed is just letting Russia/China know their claims of 5th gen aircraft superior to F-22s and F-35s, may not be as useful in a real conflict as their initial war game modeling indicated. Just one of many black ops technologies that can be spun up in a short period of time to a mass production scenario. Warehouses are not mobile but trucks are, and mobile fusion on a battlefield, delivers some serious possibilities.

    It also does not surprise me Lockheed was the company chosen to spin this up out of the black world. Will be nice to see it used as any energy alternative, making electric cars and other energy intensive technologies not only possible but environmentally friendly. I think the US wants to pull the plug on fossil fuel dependance or at least its usage in transportation technologies. Hydrocarbons will still have their place in plastics and pharmaceuticals.

    *WM*
    sit on the edge to watch something unfold with a force we cannot control but communicate with

  3. #3
    They say they've been developing it for 60 years. That's a lot of money on R & D with no as yet end product. I don't think any spec. have been released for it.
    Also very interestingly the US Navy has developed a hydrocarbon fuel made from seawater
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...n_5113822.html.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Longeyes View Post
    They say they've been developing it for 60 years. That's a lot of money on R & D with no as yet end product. I don't think any spec. have been released for it.
    Also very interestingly the US Navy has developed a hydrocarbon fuel made from seawater
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...n_5113822.html.
    A fusion reactor would make a sea jet fuel generation highly feasible. Basically aircraft carrier do not need to carry fuel or a drastically reduced amount. It also makes them much less vulnerable, because they do not need to refuel for Jets. Indefinite deployment, or extended deployment. All that is left is sustainable on board food production which would be feasible in a system like aquaponics.

    Hydrocarbons would give the navy plastics and pharmaceutical, 3d printing technology provides the capacity of manufacturing replacement parts from various polymers. Literally a self sustaining city at sea. Underwater bases also become much more feasible. The logistic become personnel based, basically rotating crews on an off platforms which do not have any downtime or comparably a very low downtime. Add drones and this becomes an automated war machine, which can be operated with minimal human intervention from any bunker location in the world. On board personnel would basically be maintenance, and/or emergency override/shutdown crews. If drones and robotics end up being cheap to manufacture, then future wars are going to be fought by robots.

    Another lynchpin technology being released and being spun up, to ensure manufacturing availability in the near future.

    *WM*
    sit on the edge to watch something unfold with a force we cannot control but communicate with

  5. #5
    It's no secret really this has been coming down the road for a long time, as has been said. I think it has been several years now that they have been able to contain the reaction magnetically at lower energy coast for result, but it produced just a fraction more energy than it took to contain. So that had been a problem they had overcome and knew would improve rapidly.

    From what I understood the main problem was with the ablation of the interior of the containment bottle. That's one thing I'd like to hear about.

    I think it was about forty years ago that I remember researches saying fusion was just another decade down the road. Good PR though huh

  6. #6
    It'd be great if we have working fusion reactors for power and free ourselves of fossil fuel dependency, If it were up to me I'd make the technology available to the whole world for free, But unfortunately I think the main drive for technological advancement is "how can we make money off it?" We may still be use natural gas to do our cooking, (Can't really stick your food in a fusion reactor to bake it) and I imagine that most houses that have gas stoves may likely also use gas for heating.

  7. #7
    Here is stanford with the technology a hop an a skip away from delivering the energy without any loss:


    Rattled Atoms Mimic High-temperature Superconductivity
    X-ray Laser Experiment Provides First Look at Changes in Atomic Structure that Support Superconductivity
    December 4, 2014

    An experiment at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provided the first fleeting glimpse of the atomic structure of a material as it entered a state resembling room-temperature superconductivity – a long-sought phenomenon in which materials might conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency under everyday conditions.

    Researchers used a specific wavelength of laser light to rattle the atomic structure of a material called yttrium barium copper oxide, or YBCO. Then they probed the resulting changes in the structure with an X-ray laser beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

    They discovered that the initial exposure to laser light triggered specific shifts in copper and oxygen atoms that squeezed and stretched the distances between them, creating a temporary alignment that exhibited signs of superconductivity for a few trillionths of a second at well above room temperature – up to 60 degrees Celsius (140 degrees Fahrenheit). The scientists coupled data from the experiment with theory to show how these changes in atomic positions allow a transfer of electrons that drives the superconductivity.

    New Views of Atoms in Motion

    “This is a highly interesting state, even though it only exists for a short period of time,” said Roman Mankowsky of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg, Germany, who was lead author of a report on the experiment in the Dec. 4 print issue of Nature. -- http://www.nature.com/nature/journal...ture13875.html

    “When the laser excites the material, it shifts the atoms and changes the structure. We hope these results will ultimately help in the design of new materials to enhance superconductivity.”

    https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/news/...ductivity.aspx

    -------------------------------------

    A lot of these technologies are going to work hand in hand to create something truly interesting by their cutoff of 2025...

    *WM*
    sit on the edge to watch something unfold with a force we cannot control but communicate with

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by WildMage View Post
    sounds more like the costs to bring this technology out of the black and into the grey world of labs & academia. Scrubbing and recreating the background history of the various aspects behind this technology.
    that and the fact that it is compact and not the size of a warehouse is quite interesting, because it makes transferable to transport type technologies. It also indicates they may have had this technology for many many years and have gone thru multiple iterations already, which is usually the case when tech gets miniaturized.

    100 MWs on a truck may also point to the possibility of human transportable 1-5 MW laser weapons, or 10-20 MW howitzer type laser cannons or tank/armor mounted lasers.

    Maybe Lockheed is just letting Russia/China know their claims of 5th gen aircraft superior to F-22s and F-35s, may not be as useful in a real conflict as their initial war game modeling indicated. Just one of many black ops technologies that can be spun up in a short period of time to a mass production scenario. Warehouses are not mobile but trucks are, and mobile fusion on a battlefield, delivers some serious possibilities.

    It also does not surprise me Lockheed was the company chosen to spin this up out of the black world. Will be nice to see it used as any energy alternative, making electric cars and other energy intensive technologies not only possible but environmentally friendly. I think the US wants to pull the plug on fossil fuel dependance or at least its usage in transportation technologies. Hydrocarbons will still have their place in plastics and pharmaceuticals.

    *WM*
    Well said

  9. #9
    Next up - 'Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion technology, known as OTEC, uses the ocean’s natural thermal gradient to generate power.'

    http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/products/otec.html


  10. #10
    Thermoelectric exchangers will use tellurides most commonly bismuth telluride and lead telluride. The those of you interested in jigsaw puzzles, Boyd Bushman mentioned Telluride were a key ingredient in ET craft held by the US.
    And here is the OPEC patent and it contains bismuth telluride
    http://www.google.co.uk/patents/US8146362

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