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Thread: Tall Whites and the book series 'Millennial Hospitality'

  1. #51
    Here's the link of the thread I started up on that all white being encounter:

    http://www.theoutpostforum.com/tof/s...=tall+white%2C

    Also, here's a link to my website. http://eyeontheblind.webs.com/
    Last edited by A99; 04-01-2016 at 11:23 PM.
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    For it is in giving that we receive.
    ~ St. Francis of Assisi

  2. #52
    Found this piece after googling up "Tall Whites". It'a on Colin Wilson's website. The tall being seen by the policeman is not describe as having white skin but it was dressed all in white nevertheless.
    http://www.colinandrews.net/UFO-Presteigne-Meeting.html

    Next at the meeting to share his experience was another former policeman, Ken, who had his
    encounter on the outskirts of Bristol while driving home after his work shift. He was passing the
    entrance gate of a research facility when he saw an eight-to-nine foot tall being. With no other
    vocabulary to express it, he called the being a ‘spaceman’. The being was wearing a one-piece suit
    and a helmet with a black visor over his eyes. Ken said that as he was not on duty and had no idea
    what he was looking at, he went straight home, arriving still in shock. Although he told his wife, who
    did not believe it, he decided not to make an official report fearing professional repercussions. The
    next day he learned from the newspaper of two other people who reported seeing a ‘spaceman’
    looking into their car at Chilcomb, near Winchester, after their car engine failed. Ken was reading
    about the famous
    Joyce Boyles and Ted Pratt encounter mentioned above. Both Ken’s event and
    theirs happened the same night in 1976. Chilcomb is about seventy miles southeast of Bristol.



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    For it is in giving that we receive.
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  3. #53
    Sorry for the typo's in previous post. Had not had my coffee yet and my carpal tunnel's thing on my left hand, which is an on and off thing, is acting up again.
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    For it is in giving that we receive.
    ~ St. Francis of Assisi

  4. #54
    I am a believer. I believe that intelligent life is out there, I believe aliens have been visiting us for a long time. I have no problem to believe that aliens may be living on the planet.


    That being said, I've just finished reading Charles Hall's five books. In my opinion it all is a hoax. Where should I begin?

    Are you expecting these books to be about alien encounters? Forget it, that's not what they are. If we take the five volumes as one, 80 to 90% of it is about Hall's everyday life as a US Airforce weather observer. He describes his duties thoroughly day after day, along with descriptions of the scenery the roads, the buildings, etc. We even have to read endless pages about his tour of duty in Vietnam. The five books repeatedly repeat themselves and we sometimes read the same episode two or three times. The fourth book, for example, practically repeats the first one.
    Considering the amount of pages in the five books the actual tales about aliens are quiet scarce.

    Earing Hall’s interviews and reading his books are two different things. In the interviews he is constantly referring to his books and yet there are things he mentions in the interviews that are not in the books. Listening to the man I really wanted his story to be true, and that’s why I read the five books in a row.
    There are so many inconsistencies in the narrative that it would take me a long time to list them all.

    Throughout the books the most used words are fear and terror. Everyone is terrified. There isn’t a brave man at Nellis base. Every airman who encounters the aliens is absolutely terrified of them, pissing in their pants terrified. This of course in spite of the fact that these aliens could actually be mistaken for humans. Should they have had a monster like form the all base personnel would have died of terror.
    The aliens themselves are terrified as well, even when they are in great numbers, armed and facing a single unarmed human. Everybody lives in terror!

    Almost all of the alien encounters reported by Charles Hall are a game of hide and seek. They are lurking in the shadows, they hide and run away like children. Later on there is actual contact and he claims to be good friends with some of them. There is this particular alien whom Hall saves his life and because of that he claims they are like brothers although nothing ever happens between each other and they rarely even speak.

    For someone who is later supposed to be a scientist Hall showed back then no curiosity at all about the aliens. During more than two years of contact he hardly questions them about anything. 99% of the (very scarce) information is provided by the aliens themselves, intently or by chance when he eavesdrops conversations between the aliens and the generals, or when he listens to the thoughts of aliens talking among themselves using a machine capable of communication by thought. Why the aliens should use a machine to communicate by thought amongst themselves is a mystery to me. Why should they speak English among themselves (when Hall was not present) is another.

    Hall is authorized (by the Pentagon) to go anywhere he wants whenever he wants. But he never goes anywhere that matters! Sure, he drives and walks a lot, he gives ample description of the mountains and valleys. He sees a lot of alien crafts (almost always from afar), but he never goes to the interesting places. He claims to find the bases of the aliens but he doesn’t go near them. Why? Because he is terrified, he is always terrified. He “lives” with aliens for more than two years and all his conversation with them is chitchat. When in his shoes I’m sure all of us could think of a thousand questions to ask, but not airman Hall. He was all about small talk.

    Charles Hall is amazing at drawing his own conclusions about alien facts based on… anything, really. Sometimes, out of the blue, he presents as truth facts that cannot be supported by his own narrative, scientifically or otherwise. One of his most treasured conclusions was that the aliens could run and move very fast because their nervous system was three times faster than our own. The man was a weather observer not a doctor. His assumptions on the origin of the aliens is also amusing. In his words he doesn’t offer hypothesis, he issues statements which are based only on what he thinks to be true and not on something he was told or shown by the aliens.

    For a long time, Charles Hall thinks the aliens he sees are illusions from his mind. These “illusions” leave footprints all over the place, but he doesn’t care about it. Almost all of his friends at Nellis saw the aliens. The descriptions they give of them are absolutely the same as Hall’s, but nevertheless he continues to think they are illusions. Not for one moment does he stop to think how strange it is for everyone to be having the same illusions, or does he discuss this with the others.

    Charlie Hall (Baker in most of the books) is portrayed as a hero. Both colleagues, officers, generals and even the aliens say he is the bravest man they ever met. The concept is repeated constantly throughout the books. However, his actions are always of a sissy since he is afraid all the time.
    He is also (said by everyone) a very intelligent man. He is supposed to have an IQ of 140. How smart he is is also something recurrent in the books.

    Hall’s real but not declared job at Nellis airbase is to prepare aliens for interaction with humans. Well nor only he seldom interacts, but the all idea doesn’t really add up. Almost all of the aliens are afraid of him, because he is human. However the generals and their staff walk along with alien parties all the time. At some point a general (accompanied by lots of alien) exposes Hall for them to see what a human is like. He even asks if they want to see his teeth (?). Weren’t the general and staff human too????

    The last book is appalling. In what seems to be the need to try and make a few more bucks, Hall repeats his story all over again. Yes, the same all thing, step by step in a different but similar location but this time leaving the tall white out of the picture. Now it’s all about the greys. The same hide and seek in the shadows as before, but no actual contact this time.
    At the end of the book Hall presents his own version of the Roswell events, not as a theory but as the real thing, all based on… his own mind I guess.

    There is much more that could be said, but I have already abused your patience.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nautillus View Post
    I am a believer. I believe that intelligent life is out there, I believe aliens have been visiting us for a long time. I have no problem to believe that aliens may be living on the planet.


    That being said, I've just finished reading Charles Hall's five books. In my opinion it all is a hoax. Where should I begin?

    Are you expecting these books to be about alien encounters? Forget it, that's not what they are. If we take the five volumes as one, 80 to 90% of it is about Hall's everyday life as a US Airforce weather observer. He describes his duties thoroughly day after day, along with descriptions of the scenery the roads, the buildings, etc. We even have to read endless pages about his tour of duty in Vietnam. The five books repeatedly repeat themselves and we sometimes read the same episode two or three times. The fourth book, for example, practically repeats the first one.
    Considering the amount of pages in the five books the actual tales about aliens are quiet scarce.

    Earing Hall’s interviews and reading his books are two different things. In the interviews he is constantly referring to his books and yet there are things he mentions in the interviews that are not in the books. Listening to the man I really wanted his story to be true, and that’s why I read the five books in a row.
    There are so many inconsistencies in the narrative that it would take me a long time to list them all.

    Throughout the books the most used words are fear and terror. Everyone is terrified. There isn’t a brave man at Nellis base. Every airman who encounters the aliens is absolutely terrified of them, pissing in their pants terrified. This of course in spite of the fact that these aliens could actually be mistaken for humans. Should they have had a monster like form the all base personnel would have died of terror.
    The aliens themselves are terrified as well, even when they are in great numbers, armed and facing a single unarmed human. Everybody lives in terror!

    Almost all of the alien encounters reported by Charles Hall are a game of hide and seek. They are lurking in the shadows, they hide and run away like children. Later on there is actual contact and he claims to be good friends with some of them. There is this particular alien whom Hall saves his life and because of that he claims they are like brothers although nothing ever happens between each other and they rarely even speak.

    For someone who is later supposed to be a scientist Hall showed back then no curiosity at all about the aliens. During more than two years of contact he hardly questions them about anything. 99% of the (very scarce) information is provided by the aliens themselves, intently or by chance when he eavesdrops conversations between the aliens and the generals, or when he listens to the thoughts of aliens talking among themselves using a machine capable of communication by thought. Why the aliens should use a machine to communicate by thought amongst themselves is a mystery to me. Why should they speak English among themselves (when Hall was not present) is another.

    Hall is authorized (by the Pentagon) to go anywhere he wants whenever he wants. But he never goes anywhere that matters! Sure, he drives and walks a lot, he gives ample description of the mountains and valleys. He sees a lot of alien crafts (almost always from afar), but he never goes to the interesting places. He claims to find the bases of the aliens but he doesn’t go near them. Why? Because he is terrified, he is always terrified. He “lives” with aliens for more than two years and all his conversation with them is chitchat. When in his shoes I’m sure all of us could think of a thousand questions to ask, but not airman Hall. He was all about small talk.

    Charles Hall is amazing at drawing his own conclusions about alien facts based on… anything, really. Sometimes, out of the blue, he presents as truth facts that cannot be supported by his own narrative, scientifically or otherwise. One of his most treasured conclusions was that the aliens could run and move very fast because their nervous system was three times faster than our own. The man was a weather observer not a doctor. His assumptions on the origin of the aliens is also amusing. In his words he doesn’t offer hypothesis, he issues statements which are based only on what he thinks to be true and not on something he was told or shown by the aliens.

    For a long time, Charles Hall thinks the aliens he sees are illusions from his mind. These “illusions” leave footprints all over the place, but he doesn’t care about it. Almost all of his friends at Nellis saw the aliens. The descriptions they give of them are absolutely the same as Hall’s, but nevertheless he continues to think they are illusions. Not for one moment does he stop to think how strange it is for everyone to be having the same illusions, or does he discuss this with the others.

    Charlie Hall (Baker in most of the books) is portrayed as a hero. Both colleagues, officers, generals and even the aliens say he is the bravest man they ever met. The concept is repeated constantly throughout the books. However, his actions are always of a sissy since he is afraid all the time.
    He is also (said by everyone) a very intelligent man. He is supposed to have an IQ of 140. How smart he is is also something recurrent in the books.

    Hall’s real but not declared job at Nellis airbase is to prepare aliens for interaction with humans. Well nor only he seldom interacts, but the all idea doesn’t really add up. Almost all of the aliens are afraid of him, because he is human. However the generals and their staff walk along with alien parties all the time. At some point a general (accompanied by lots of alien) exposes Hall for them to see what a human is like. He even asks if they want to see his teeth (?). Weren’t the general and staff human too????

    The last book is appalling. In what seems to be the need to try and make a few more bucks, Hall repeats his story all over again. Yes, the same all thing, step by step in a different but similar location but this time leaving the tall white out of the picture. Now it’s all about the greys. The same hide and seek in the shadows as before, but no actual contact this time.
    At the end of the book Hall presents his own version of the Roswell events, not as a theory but as the real thing, all based on… his own mind I guess.

    There is much more that could be said, but I have already abused your patience.
    This is an excellent well done and thought out critique, thanks for this Nautillus.
    We control matter because we control the mind. Reality is inside the skull.
    ~ George Orwell ‘1984’

  6. #56
    You've put a lot of time into doing that Nautillus. Thanks, it confirms for me what I've suspected long suspected about Charles Hall - he's not the real deal.

  7. #57
    Thanks as well Nautilus. I will definitely never read those books now.

    How bad were the contradictions between the books? Were they so bad that it gives the impression that he is not lying but deceived into thinking what he experienced is real? I wonder if he was experimented on at that base, with something that might cause him to have consistent hallucinations. He just doesn't seem like a liar, but his story is funky all over when it comes to the tall white content.

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Sansanoy View Post
    Thanks as well Nautilus. I will definitely never read those books now.

    How bad were the contradictions between the books? Were they so bad that it gives the impression that he is not lying but deceived into thinking what he experienced is real? I wonder if he was experimented on at that base, with something that might cause him to have consistent hallucinations. He just doesn't seem like a liar, but his story is funky all over when it comes to the tall white content.

    There are no contradictions between the books, or within the narrative itself. It is the nature of his story that lacks verisimilitude. All the content about the aliens and Hall's interaction (or the lack of it) with them could easily fit in a single book. The rest is about Hall's daily activities as a weather observer, the trips to Vegas, the landscape, his friends and how amazing he is. He saves the day at least two times and he is always said to be an incredible human being. The bravest, the smartest, a hero in everyone's words.

    The aliens are portrayed as a notorious more advanced race that behaves like children, playing constant hide and seek, peeking lockers and drawers. Throughout the five books the actual data on the aliens is almost inexistent mostly because during more then two years Charles Hall hardly asks them a question. All there is is their physical description, that of their crafts and a few other details.

  9. #59
    You post has been food for thought over the last few days. Thanks Nautillus
    Last edited by GusB; 04-13-2016 at 10:56 PM.

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