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Thread: Olmec Yogis?

  1. #11
    Here are a couple of other snapshots of me at Monte Alban's at those pyramid ruins.

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  2. #12
    Here's the timeline for several events that are relevant to this topic; all from wiki.

    Buddha's death ... a symposium on this question held in 1988,the majority of those who presented definite opinions gave dates within 20 years either side of 400 BCE for the Buddha's death.


    He attained enlightenment at the age of 35 and soon after that, he began to attract followers in northern India. He taught for the next 45 years and died at 80.


    The Olmec civilization flourished roughly between 1200 BC and 400 BC,


    The heads date from at least before 900 BC and are a distinctive feature of the Olmec civilization of ancient Mesoamerica.




    Who brought Buddhism to China?
    It was brought to China by Buddhist monks from India during the latter part of the Han dynasty (ca. 150 CE) and took over a century to become assimilated into Chinese culture. One of the key forces of Buddhism's success was Daoism.


    Initially, Buddhism remained one of the many small sects in India. The main breakthrough came when King Asoka (ca. 270-232 BCE) converted to Buddhism. He did not make it a state religion, but supported all ethical religions. He organised the spreading of Buddhism throughout India, but also beyond; most importantly to Shri Lanka. This occurred after the Third Council.
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  3. #13
    Unfortunately, the authors claims do not match up to the established/mainstream timeline of sig. events that are relevant to his claims.

    For example, let's look at what the author of that article that's posted in the OP says about the Olmec heads. The link for that, which is a different article than the one in the OP of this thread, is on his site on the following page: http://www.bibhudevmisra.com/2016/10...rve-as_14.html

    The author claims that those heads are Dvarapalas, protectors of Hindu-Buddhist temples.

    But, mainstream archaeologists state that those Olmec heads were created before 900 BC.

    That's centuries before Buddha was even born and when, thereafter, Buddhism spread in India and then to China.

    So this would cancel out, at least according to mainstream archaeologists, any assumptions that those Olmec colossal heads are Dvarapalas.


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  4. #14
    Now let's look at the author's claim that "Olmec clay figurines and stone statues...depict yogic asanas." And that it came by way of China.

    As stated in one of my previous posts here, there is some legitimate support in the academic community that ancient Hindi seafarers from India traded in Mexico and Central America in the BCE.

    Because the Olmec's appeared suddenly as a fully developed civilization where Hindu-Buddhist artifacts were left in their wake which occurred just as suddenly as they disappeared centuries later, we could surmise that the Olmec's were Hindu-Buddhist Asians from India who may have also blended in with the existing indigenous populations in those area's where they settled.

    As for China... Hindu-Buddhism was not introduced to that country until 150 AD'. That's centuries after the Olmec civilization ended.

    Any Chinese influence, stylistically-wise, in the Olmec's Hindi-Buddhist sculpture, figurines and art already existed in India due to that country's cultural assimilation of the Chinese influence in their art. The Hindu-Buddhist Indians had already been trading with the Chinese for centuries prior to the time when they landed in Mexico. In addition to this, Hindu-Buddhist statues, figurines and art in MX look oriental because the indigenous tribes in MX and Central America, looked Mongoloid.

    The information above would seem to support the notion that it was not the Chinese who brought yoga to MX, but the Asian Hindu-Buddhists from India. And, in fact, the Olmec's could have been Asian Indian.
    Last edited by A99; 02-13-2017 at 10:32 PM.
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  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by A99 View Post
    Unfortunately, the authors claims do not match up to the established/mainstream timeline of sig. events that are relevant to his claims.

    For example, let's look at what the author of that article that's posted in the OP says about the Olmec heads. The link for that, which is a different article than the one in the OP of this thread, is on his site on the following page: http://www.bibhudevmisra.com/2016/10...rve-as_14.html

    The author claims that those heads are Dvarapalas, protectors of Hindu-Buddhist temples.

    But, mainstream archaeologists state that those Olmec heads were created before 900 BC.

    That's centuries before Buddha was even born and when, thereafter, Buddhism spread in India and then to China.

    So this would cancel out, at least according to mainstream archaeologists, any assumptions that those Olmec colossal heads are Dvarapalas.


    On the other hand, Dvarapalas are seen in the Hindu culture (and the Buddhist culture too).. So in that case, that's very well what those Olmec heads could be. But they are not Hindu-Buddhist because Buddha wasn't born until centuries later.

    But once again, it's not from China wrt the Olmec's. It's the Hindu Indians from India. They may have been there before they became Hindu-Buddhists. Prior to that they were only Hindu.
    Last edited by A99; 02-13-2017 at 10:53 PM.
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