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Thread: Don't Mess with the Charge Nurse

  1. #1

    Don't Mess with the Charge Nurse

    I worked in ER for a little over a year in a training program I was in. Watching how the police treated that charge nurse makes my blood boil. They were clearly in the wrong and I hope she presses charges. Such police brutality was TOTALLY uncalled for!

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    For it is in giving that we receive.
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  2. #2
    That police body cam vid is suspected to have been edited by the police dept. before it was released to the public. No surprise there. lol
    At least there were plenty of witnesses around during the time of that incident to confirm what the police edited out and added onto it should it ever go to court.
    Last edited by A99; 09-01-2017 at 07:08 PM.
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    For it is in giving that we receive.
    ~ St. Francis of Assisi

  3. #3
    And police wonder why "the public doesn't trust them"...

    It appeared as if at least one of the other officers wasn't happy with the woman being man-handled, cuffed and arrested. Yet, he did nothing to protect her. I suppose, he was confused and concerned what would happen to him and his job if he interfered. Clearly a case of police brutality. At least one officer was wearing a body camera. Of course, government will claim it is only an isolated incident.

    Isolated Incident? Soon we'll be hearing about accused police brutality, however "body cameras were malfunctioning" and not recording at the time.

    Wondering if in the near future, a law will be passed and or undone that will allow police to demand blood be drawn at any time.

  4. #4
    This police dept. seems pretty shifty and for that reason that nurse is going to have to watch her back should people in that dept. attempt any direct or indirect revenge tactics for publicly humiliating their dept.They are bullies in the strongest sense of that word and bullies always seek revenge when they don't get their way on things. The existential threat of that alone will probably steer her in the direction of suing them and then getting out of Dodge City and starting over again somewhere in another State. And all this, because she was only doing her job. What a travesty!
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    For it is in giving that we receive.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member M-Albion-3D's Avatar
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    Absolutely agree, this was dreadful to watch and in the end, it just makes one realise that the days of the friendly, helpful police officer are OVER. We need to come to terms with that and the people must come together to try and enact laws to protect us.

    The first thing that must be done imo, is to screen the candidates before they have a chance to put a badge on their shirts. There's scum out there and they jump at the chance to beat people up "legally" and get paid for it.

    A sad event but a head's up I believe.
    "The more you look, the more you see...the more you see, the more you know"
    - M.Scott

  6. #6
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Sorry to disagree folks, but I am familiar with California "Laws of Arrest", and in our state this officer would be within policy.
    1) He has the right to detain an individual on "reasonable suspicion" (a much lower standard than "probably cause") for investigation that a crime has been committed.
    In this case, obstruction of justice.

    2) In order to detain a suspect, he is authorized to use no more force than necessary to overcome her resistance. He handcuffed her, took her arm and escorted her to the patrol vehicle, where he seat-belted her (for her own safety) into the front seat.

    Excessive force, or police brutality, would be if he had pepper sprayed her eyes, or held a gun to her head etc. for no good reason. That did not happen.
    In this case, he used only the force necessary to insure her compliance with his lawful orders.
    From what I saw, there was little to no "resisting arrest" on the part of the nurse.

    There may be a question about the officers decision that the nurse was "obstructing justice", but that is for a judge to decide.
    I once told my young son, "even if your elementary school has a zero tolerance policy against fighting, I expect you to defend yourself if attacked". This meant that doing what was ethically right might result in a price to pay (defensive blow may cause punishment/detention), but that price was usually worth it.
    The nurse did what she felt was ethically right, and it resulted in her arrest (I suspect, no conviction) IMHO she can hold her head high in the knowledge that she did what was ethically right.
    But on the flip side, the Officer was doing his job. And ultimately right or not, did so without excessive force. No one was permanently injured or killed.

    The police have a difficult job safeguarding the public.
    They are granted extraordinary police powers to fulfill the job, but the Police have clear cut rules to abide by.
    As long as the Police abide by their rules (the 6 levels of force escalation), I feel comfortable allowing them to keep me safe.
    In this case IMHO, the hysteria of "Police Brutality" seems overstated.
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
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  7. #7
    If it were me, I would have frozen in place in panic when that cop started galloping towards me and saying what he was saying. Once he grabbed hold of me, I would have not resisted his shoving me out of the building while grabbing my breasts and then throwing me against the wall to handcuff me... simply because I would have been too terrified of him. I wouldn't have screamed or have said anything at all because I would have thought by doing so, he would become much more forceful in his handling of me if I did.

    But that's just me. The whole notion that I was being wrongly apprehended like that for simply following the hospital rules, my supervisor's order and, for that matter, Constitutional Law, wrt his unlawful/illegal demand to have that blood sample, would have left my mind completely because all I would be thinking about is if he was going to beat me up once he got me to the car.
    Last edited by A99; 09-03-2017 at 12:41 AM.
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    For it is in giving that we receive.
    ~ St. Francis of Assisi

  8. #8
    Excessive, questionable. But I have to agree with cali. Both may be justified in what went down
    "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth"
    Sherlock Holmes

  9. #9
    The nurse already could tell that the cop was very agitated that he was not going to get that blood sample without a warrant. And when he tried to grab her phone from her hand, even though he had no right to do that, for her own safety (and perhaps to diffuse the situation a bit), she should have just allowed him to take it; but she didn't.

    The cop obviously has an anger management problem. Even if she had allowed him to grab her phone out of her hand, because by that point he was so 'out of control', most likely he still would have grabbed the nurse and handcuffed her (and arrested her) to hold her hostage until the hospital finally agreed to hand over that blood sample without a warrant.

    In my view, the cop seemed so emotionally unstable, I don't think he really was fully aware of his actions. Being a cop is a VERY stressful job. It looks like he finally reached his breaking point during that incident.
    Last edited by A99; 09-03-2017 at 02:58 AM.
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    For it is in giving that we receive.
    ~ St. Francis of Assisi

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by A99 View Post
    The nurse already could tell that the cop was very agitated that he was not going to get that blood sample without a warrant. And when he tried to grab her phone from her hand, even though he had no right to do that, for her own safety (and perhaps to diffuse the situation a bit), she should have just allowed him to take it; but she didn't.

    The cop obviously has an anger management problem. Even if she had allowed him to grab her phone out of her hand, because by that point he was so 'out of control', most likely he still would have grabbed the nurse and handcuffed her (and arrested her) to hold her hostage until the hospital finally agreed to hand over that blood sample without a warrant.

    In my view, the cop seemed so emotionally unstable, I don't think he really was fully aware of his actions. Being a cop is a VERY stressful job. It looks like he finally reached his breaking point during that incident.
    Could be interesting if the Officer ends up in that ER for treatment of anything, and that nurse is on duty . . . (Ouch!)

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