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Thread: Don't Mess with the Charge Nurse

  1. #11
    Well, the whole incident was crazy to begin with... an ending like the one you are suggesting would not be surprising at all. lol
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  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by A99 View Post
    Well, the whole incident was crazy to begin with... an ending like the one you are suggesting would not be surprising at all. lol
    As a retired criminal defense lawyer, here's my take on this.

    More than a year ago already, the Supreme Court decided that a warrant is needed to draw blood from a DUI suspect who does not consent.

    In other words, it has been confirmed that it is illegal to draw blood from an unconscious suspect for more than a year already.
    Police officers are supposed to know and enforce the law.

    In this case, the police officer was breaking the law, and the nurse rightfully refused to cooperate.
    She would be an accessory to a crime if she did.

    His use of force to pursue illegal activities was completely unwarranted. In most countries, the way he used unauthorized force for an unauthorized arrest would automatically be classified as assault, unlawful detention, and abuse of power.

    Both the mayor and the police department have apologized to the nurse.

    The DA has rightfully requested a criminal investigation be opened against the police officer and against his superior officer who encouraged him to arrest the nurse.

    While I do appreciate the hard work police officers do, and the often difficult circumstances in which they have to operate, they too must respect the law, not attack the civilians they are supposed to serve and protect.
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  3. #13
    Well there you have it. Thanks Garuda!
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  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by epo333 View Post
    Could be interesting if the Officer ends up in that ER for treatment of anything, and that nurse is on duty . . . (Ouch!)
    After what he put that nurse through, if he ever ended up in ER someday with her as his nurse, based on the fact that she's a complete professional, I'm definitely sure he would get the same quality of care that she gives all of her patients regardless of how he unfairly brutalized her in that incident that is the topic of this thread.

    Coincidences do happen though and I would feel very sorry for her if someday he ends up as her patient in ER... or some other dept. there.

    When I first commented on your post Epo, which was late last night, I misunderstood exactly what your comment meant. It was late and I was tired. Now reading it again, I felt I needed to add the above clarification... As Garuda pointed out, it was the cop who was clearly in the wrong in that incident, not the nurse. In all of my other posts in this thread, I was pointing that out too.
    Last edited by A99; 09-03-2017 at 01:11 PM.
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  5. #15
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garuda View Post
    As a retired criminal defense lawyer, here's my take on this.

    More than a year ago already, the Supreme Court decided that a warrant is needed to draw blood from a DUI suspect who does not consent.

    In other words, it has been confirmed that it is illegal to draw blood from an unconscious suspect for more than a year already.
    Police officers are supposed to know and enforce the law.

    In this case, the police officer was breaking the law, and the nurse rightfully refused to cooperate.
    She would be an accessory to a crime if she did.

    His use of force to pursue illegal activities was completely unwarranted. In most countries, the way he used unauthorized force for an unauthorized arrest would automatically be classified as assault, unlawful detention, and abuse of power.

    Both the mayor and the police department have apologized to the nurse.

    The DA has rightfully requested a criminal investigation be opened against the police officer and against his superior officer who encouraged him to arrest the nurse.

    While I do appreciate the hard work police officers do, and the often difficult circumstances in which they have to operate, they too must respect the law, not attack the civilians they are supposed to serve and protect.
    I don't think she should have been arrested either.
    My point was the actual arrest was within guidelines.
    What remains to be seen is IF his "reasonable suspicion" was actually reasonable.
    That will be the subject of the investigation into HIS actions, probably conducted by an internal review board.
    As I mentioned before, thankfully no one was seriously injured during the incident.

    I did find it interesting that at one point an officer tells the nurse (paraphrase) "you are talking about hospital policy, and I am talking about the law". Apparently the officers were unaware of the change to the law... you'd think they would have had better training.
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  6. #16
    Cal stated: "As I mentioned before, thankfully no one was seriously injured during the incident."

    The "suspect" which is who the cops were chasing after on the road that ended up in that accident with the truck driver who ended up in the hospital where the cops then tried to get his blood sample without a warrant, died in that accident.

    Because the cops were involved in that accident that resulted in the death of the guy they were chasing after and this regardless that the collision occurred between their suspect and that poor truck driver... I find it VERY interesting why the cops/police dept. wanted the truck drivers blood sample right away if not sooner. Perhaps to exonerate themselves in some way as being partly to blame as to why that car accident occurred in the first place that resulted in one fatality where the guy he crashed into ended up in a coma? Maybe they were hoping that the truck driver had alcohol or drugs in his system at the time of that collision. Don't think I need to explain why that is.

    The accident would never have occurred if it weren't for the fact that it was a car chase between the police dept and their 'suspect'. The truck driver just happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time. Now he's fighting for his life.

    Last edited by A99; 09-03-2017 at 01:48 PM.
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  7. #17
    Cal said: "I did find it interesting that at one point an officer tells the nurse (paraphrase) "you are talking about hospital policy, and I am talking about the law". Apparently the officers were unaware of the change to the law... you'd think they would have better training."

    I strongly suspect that they already knew that law... they also knew that if they put in a request for a warrant for that blood test, that it would not be approved because it lacked the necessary criteria for that approval. The truck driver was not a suspect in that accident. The suspect (as to who was responsible for the car crash) was the guy in the other car whom the police were chasing after on the road.

    This is why they instead sought to get that blood sample of the truck driver without a warrant... the charge nurse and her supervisor's were not going along with their demand on that. For good reason too!
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  8. #18
    For anyone interested in the following information: Just found this article that goes into that incident in more depth.

    https://www.acsh.org/news/2017/09/01...est-core-11778

    Also, I mentioned before in another post here information about that warrant but it was based on an article I read somewhere but this is not to say that the information on it was correct. Something about the police dept. request for that warrant might not have been approved because the unconscious patient was cited by the police as the victim of the car crash and not the suspect (the one who caused the crash).
    Last edited by A99; 09-03-2017 at 06:04 PM.
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  9. #19
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Seems the nurse was vendicated, and the police officer lost his job.

    Arrested Nurse Settles With Salt Lake City and University for $500,000
    By Matt Stevens
    A Utah nurse who was forcefully detained by a police officer in July settled with the University of Utah and Salt Lake City on Tuesday for a total of $500,000.

    The rough arrest of the nurse, who had refused the officer’s request to draw a sedated patient’s blood as part of a police investigation, was captured on body camera video and viewed widely online.

    The tense incident led officials at the hospital — run by University of Utah Health — to bar police officers from patient-care areas; the police officer involved, Detective Jeff L. Payne, was eventually fired from his job with the police department and from a part-time job he held as a paramedic.

    No charges were filed against the nurse, Alex Wubbels, who said at a news conference on Tuesday that she was “grateful” for the outcome of what she called an “emotional situation.”
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