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Thread: Cutting Edge Technology in the news

  1. #351
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Can't help but think of the "Patriat Act", something many consider anything BUT patriotic. Here a bill starts out as eMail privacy protection legislation for the average citizen, and because the L.E. complains, it morphs into a carte blanche eMail invasion of privacy bill. Freedom to protect my affairs from prying eyes without some form of reasonable suspicion is all I ask. Legislators that knuckle under to pressure to deprive me of this freedom will be duly voted out of a job.

    Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants

    Proposed law scheduled for a vote next week originally increased Americans' e-mail privacy. Then law enforcement complained. Now it increases government access to e-mail and other digital files.


    by Declan McCullagh
    A Senate proposal touted as protecting Americans' e-mail privacy has been quietly rewritten, giving government agencies more surveillance power than they possess under current law.

    CNET has learned that Patrick Leahy, the influential Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee, has dramatically reshaped his legislation in response to law enforcement concerns. A vote on his bill, which now authorizes warrantless access to Americans' e-mail, is scheduled for next week.

    Revised bill highlights

    ✭ Grants warrantless access to Americans' electronic correspondence to over 22 federal agencies. Only a subpoena is required, not a search warrant signed by a judge based on probable cause.

    ✭ Permits state and local law enforcement to warrantlessly access Americans' correspondence stored on systems not offered "to the public," including university networks.

    ✭ Authorizes any law enforcement agency to access accounts without a warrant -- or subsequent court review -- if they claim "emergency" situations exist.

    ✭ Says providers "shall notify" law enforcement in advance of any plans to tell their customers that they've been the target of a warrant, order, or subpoena.

    ✭ Delays notification of customers whose accounts have been accessed from 3 days to "10 business days." This notification can be postponed by up to 360 days
    Leahy's rewritten bill would allow more than 22 agencies -- including the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Communications Commission -- to access Americans' e-mail, Google Docs files, Facebook wall posts, and Twitter direct messages without a search warrant. It also would give the FBI and Homeland Security more authority, in some circumstances, to gain full access to Internet accounts without notifying either the owner or a judge.

    It's an abrupt departure from Leahy's earlier approach, which required police to obtain a search warrant backed by probable cause before they could read the contents of e-mail or other communications. The Vermont Democrat boasted last year that his bill "provides enhanced privacy protections for American consumers by... requiring that the government obtain a search warrant."

    Leahy had planned a vote on an earlier version of his bill, designed to update a pair of 1980s-vintage surveillance laws, in late September. But after law enforcement groups including the National District Attorneys' Association and the National Sheriffs' Association organizations objected to the legislation and asked him to "reconsider acting" on it, Leahy pushed back the vote and reworked the bill as a package of amendments to be offered next Thursday. Story Continues
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  2. #352
    Quote Originally Posted by calikid View Post

    Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants

    CNET has learned that Patrick Leahy, the influential Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee, has dramatically reshaped his legislation in response to law enforcement concerns. A vote on his bill, which now authorizes warrantless access to Americans' e-mail, is scheduled for next week.

    Story Continues
    The further they tread along a trail of woes, the greater a divergence from other paths with fewer thistles and thorns to transverse.

  3. #353
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    And I thought the computer on my son's desk was the worlds oldest.

    World's oldest working computer gets fired up

    Visitors can now check out the fully restored nearly 3-ton WITCH as it lights up The National Museum of Computing with its flashing bulbs and chattering printers.
    by Dara Kerr

    With the advent of smaller, thinner, and lighter devices, it now seems crazy to think of a computer as a room-sized mechanism meant mostly for government use. But that's exactly what a computer was 61 years ago.

    Now, visitors can see what the first hardware designers were doing when they created what is currently the world's oldest working digital computer -- the Wolverhampton Instrument for Teaching Computing from Harwell, or WITCH. The more than half-a-century old device has been restored and rebooted at its home in The National Museum of Computing in Buckinghamshire, England.

    "In 1951 the Harwell Dekatron was one of perhaps a dozen computers in the world, and since then it has led a charmed life surviving intact while its contemporaries were recycled or destroyed," trustee of the museum Kevin Murrell said in a statement.

    Work began three years ago on restoring WITCH, which was first used in 1951 for atomic research. The computer was run on telephone exchange relays and hundreds of Dekatron gas-filled tubes that could each hold a single digit in memory. Paper tape was used to both input data and store the output of the machine.
    Story Continues
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
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  4. #354
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Safe web browsing for those online deals.

    How to stay safe when holiday shopping online

    Ready or not, holiday shopping season is upon us, and many of us will be buying gifts online. We've put together some tips to help get you safely through your shopping list.
    by Seth Rosenblatt

    It's that time of the year again, when savvy shoppers like yourself head to your favorite online retailers to avoid the ridiculous shenanigans and flesh-pressing of Black Friday. But just because you know enough to buy online doesn't mean that there aren't some good tips worth paying attention to. Here are a few worth repeating for habitual online shoppers.

    Change your passwords now because chances are, you haven't in a long time. Change your e-mail account password, change your banking password, and change the passwords for online shopping accounts like at Amazon. A good tip for choosing new passwords is to use at least four random words separated by spaces, as demonstrated in this XKCD comic. Not all sites accept spaces (such as Microsoft accounts), but many do -- including Google and Amazon. It's a good idea to change them again after you've completed all your seasonal shopping, too.

    Log out when you're done. Cookies can often keep you logged in to accounts even after you close the browsing tab, an obvious no-no. Get in the habit of clicking that "log out" button.

    Use two browsers to minimize your exposure to vulnerabilities. I use one browser for mission critical transactions such as e-mail and banking, and another for casual browsing.

    Browse smarter by looking for HTTPS in the URL bar and green security badges on your shopping sites. If you think you're looking at a legit site and it doesn't have either of those, I would check the URL twice to make sure you're not getting phished.

    Pay with a credit card to minimize fraud risks. Story continues
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  5. #355
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    IMHO, this is a mistake. As a user of Firefox, AND Win7 64bit, I would encourage them to move forward into the 21st century. My PC has 12Gigs of RAM that Win7 32bit doesn't even know exists. To paraphrase JFK, don't do it because it is easy, do it because it is hard and has great benefits.

    Mozilla quietly ceases Firefox 64-bit development

    Mozilla's engineering manager has requested that developers stop work on Windows 64-bit builds of Firefox.
    by Charlie Osborne
    Mozilla engineering manager Benjamin Smedberg has asked developers to stop nightly builds for Firefox versions optimized to run on 64-bit versions of Windows.

    A developer thread posted on the Google Groups mozilla.dev.planning discussion board, titled "Turning off win64 builds" by Smedberg proposed the move.

    Claiming that 64-bit Firefox is a "constant source of misunderstanding and frustration," the engineer wrote that the builds often crash, many plugins are not available in 64-bit versions, and hangs are more common due to a lack of coding which causes plugins to function incorrectly. In addition, Smedberg argues that this causes users to feel "second class," and crash reports between 32-bit and 64-bit versions are difficult to distinguish between for the stability team.

    Users can still run 32-bit Firefox on 64-bit Windows.

    Although originally willing to shelve the idea for a time if it proved controversial, Smedberg later, well, shelved that idea:

    Thank you to everyone who participated in this thread. Given the existing information, I have decided to proceed with disabling windows 64-bit nightly and hourly builds. Please let us consider this discussion closed unless there is critical new information which needs to be presented.
    Story Continues
    Last edited by calikid; 11-23-2012 at 03:12 PM. Reason: formatting
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  6. #356
    Always reluction to download stuff from the internet, unless the normal updates.

    Any thoughts on this company?

    Suppose to be a free soft that helps with Anonymity online.

    torproject.org

  7. #357
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CasperParks View Post
    Always reluction to download stuff from the internet, unless the normal updates.

    Any thoughts on this company?

    Suppose to be a free soft that helps with Anonymity online.

    torproject.org


    I will take a closer look.
    But my initial reaction, in this post 9/11 anti-terrorism world we live in, would be to act carefully when selecting an affiliation.
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  8. #358
    Lead Moderator calikid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by calikid View Post
    I will take a closer look.
    But my initial reaction, in this post 9/11 anti-terrorism world we live in, would be to act carefully when selecting an affiliation.


    My bad. Thought you were referring to helping the group, "Anon"...
    The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but
    progress. -- Joseph Joubert
    Attachment 1008

  9. #359
    Quote Originally Posted by CasperParks View Post
    Always reluction to download stuff from the internet, unless the normal updates.

    Any thoughts on this company?

    Suppose to be a free soft that helps with Anonymity online.

    torproject.org
    Find some Security sites and forums and read some reviews before downloading anything. I'll help if you need it.

  10. #360
    Quote Originally Posted by CasperParks View Post
    Always reluction to download stuff from the internet, unless the normal updates.

    torproject.org
    Doc and Calikid,

    I will avoid downloading it, not worth the risk.

    Thanks for the input.

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