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southerncross
07-22-2014, 05:12 PM
Very interesting article on earliest settlements. The dates of early settlements are pressing back.

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2014/70000-year-old-african-settlement-unearthed

Dragonfire
07-22-2014, 09:48 PM
Very interesting article on earliest settlements. The dates of early settlements are pressing back.

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2014/70000-year-old-african-settlement-unearthed
Interesting article, thanks for posting.

Nice to see you around.

Doc
07-23-2014, 04:43 PM
Very interesting article on earliest settlements. The dates of early settlements are pressing back.

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2014/70000-year-old-african-settlement-unearthed

This is one of my favorite subjects! The data is building that pushes the dates back in spite of opposition from the establishment. Their ability to bury undesirable (to them) finds is diminishing with the rise of alternative news, the internet, etc.

southerncross
07-25-2014, 03:38 PM
Sorry to be so absent. I'm 78,000 words into a book. Been busy bending over the keyboard.

This is an interesting site as well. 700,000yrs back to 1 million.

I love how facts are wrecking their history books. Man has been sophisticated longer than they would like to think. I'm waiting for the real facts to surface about large communities. Like the City of Z in South America which was very large and complex.

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2014/stone-artefacts-from-700000-year-old-south-african-site

majicbar
07-25-2014, 03:59 PM
Very interesting article on earliest settlements. The dates of early settlements are pressing back.

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2014/70000-year-old-african-settlement-unearthedThis is interesting but does only show that the locals were able to establish a settlement of some success in eking out a living in harmony with their environment. That environment began to change which pushed some of those early ancestors to seek out easier places to exploit the food supply. A permanent place of settlement such as this could lead to agriculture and thus cultural and intellectual development, but it was the nomadic ones that brought real development to the human race. There was little real competition on this site, and it was that competition that forced the greatest change and adaption of early humans to develop, change: evolve into our modern form.

CasperParks
07-25-2014, 09:01 PM
Very interesting article on earliest settlements. The dates of early settlements are pressing back.

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/07/2014/70000-year-old-african-settlement-unearthed

Looks interesting. I enjoy learning about this sort of stuff and booked marked it for later reading.

Thanks for sharing...

Doc
07-26-2014, 04:57 AM
This is interesting but does only show that the locals were able to establish a settlement of some success in eking out a living in harmony with their environment. That environment began to change which pushed some of those early ancestors to seek out easier places to exploit the food supply. A permanent place of settlement such as this could lead to agriculture and thus cultural and intellectual development, but it was the nomadic ones that brought real development to the human race. There was little real competition on this site, and it was that competition that forced the greatest change and adaption of early humans to develop, change: evolve into our modern form.

What you wrote here is what I find so interesting. We can dig up the site and learn a great deal but at some point we have to try to imagine what went on there. For example, After Sue and I finished the Desert Studies classes back in the 1990s we went on to explore on our own out in the desert. We had learned how to find sites that had been discovered and never excavated (although they were written about and published in one form or another under the supervision of the County Museum) and see what we could learn from them. We found one spot near Black Mountain that had been described and another nearby that apparently no one had written about. First we had to look all over what was visible to be certain it was man-made, without doing anything illegal of course. Then we had to estimate the age which was about 1500-2000 years approximately--from that point on everything was educated guesses based on what tribes do, what things seemed to be made for: like cooking spots, sleeping spots, etc. Virtually everything was one kind or another kind of educated guess. In our case, the education we were guessing from was recent, suited to the locale but extremely elementary. We were barely certificate-holders. If we had been able to dig we may have seen more and dated it better but we would still be guessing. That does make it fun but as you can tell from what I just wrote, you have to qualify almost every observation you make. Fun, eh? :D